World Government: Utopian Dream or Current Reality?

World Government: Utopian Dream or Current Reality?

World Government: Utopian Dream or Current Reality?

World Government: Utopian Dream or Current Reality?

Synopsis

Are we on the way to having a global government, and if so, should we embrace it? The work explores the feasibility of establishing a world government. It begins with an analysis of a short book written in 1967 that came to the conclusion that a world government was not feasible, and refutes that view using the Constitutional debates that fired up this country's best minds in 1789. The author looks at elements in today's international environment and speculates that a unified world government may not only be possible but may be the best way to ensure global peace. Arguing that a world government may be the best hope for addressing major problems facing the world, that is, poverty, global warming, global trade, the lack of financial regulation, and others, the author approaches the reasons for a world government and the steps necessary to institute it. Total disarmament must come first, he says, and he outlines what might be required to meet that desirable state. Questions of local sovereignty versus global rights and responsibilities are explored in a nontechnical way, opening the discussion to readers who are concerned about the future but who may not be experts in the areas of Political Science or Economics. Obstacles and opportunities are brought to light in a manner that will allow the reader to make his own decisions about what steps ought to be taken. A sample constitution is offered to allow a beginning point for discussion.

Excerpt

Reading a small book entitled Report from Iron Mountain on the Possibility and Desirability of Peace (Dial Press, Inc., 1967) stimulated my thoughts about world peace forty years after that book was published. Whether the Report from Iron Mountain (hereafter simply called the report) was an officially-sanctioned report or merely the conjecture of its author does not matter in our case. the questions it brought forward are interesting in and of themselves. Could we have a world government, and if so, would we want it? in the best case unified administration can bring many benefits to a large and diverse population not least of which is peace. the Report from Iron Mountain introduces the types of problems that would arise upon any decision to attempt to establish an effective world government.

As the report indicates the establishment of an effective world government would entail the concurrent establishment of world peace. the report even concludes that the establishment of world peace may be a pre-condition to the possibility of world government. the need to satisfy this pre-condition was allegedly the reason for the report being produced.

The report defines two steps that would have to be taken before world peace could be established. the first, and probably the most important, is a detailed study to determine whether world peace is possible and if it is possible whether or not it is desirable. Second, if the determination is made that peace is both possible and desirable a process must be devised to allow for the institutionalization of a general peace. This is to say that a competent structure must be put in place . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.