Generations, Inc: From Boomers to Linksters--Managing the Friction between Generations at Work

Generations, Inc: From Boomers to Linksters--Managing the Friction between Generations at Work

Generations, Inc: From Boomers to Linksters--Managing the Friction between Generations at Work

Generations, Inc: From Boomers to Linksters--Managing the Friction between Generations at Work

Synopsis

Members of each generation share special signposts: collective experiences that influence our expectations, actions, and mind-sets. They also mold our ideas about company loyalty, work ethic, and the definition of a job well done. And now that five different generations are working together simultaneously - from Traditionals to Generation Y and beyond - it's even more important to understand where everyone's coming from.

Written by two generational experts - who happen to be father and daughter - Generations, Inc. offers the perspectives of people of different eras, eliciting practical insights on wrestling with generational issues in the workplace. The book provides Baby Boomers and Linksters alike with practical techniques for:

Addressing conflicts • Forging alliances with coworkers from other generations • Getting people with disparate values and idiosyncratic styles to work together • Running productive meetings in which all participants find value in each others' ideas

Generations, Inc. provides realistic strategies for all those managers, executives, and employees seeking to coexist, flourish, and thrive together... at the same time.

Excerpt

“Life is rather like a tin of sardines—we’re all of us
looking for the key.”

—Alan Bennett, British author, actor, humorist, and playwright

Meagan Remembers

When I was six years old, I went to the grocery store with my
father. He bought an item priced at $1.69, but the cashier
misread it and only charged him 69 cents. (This was 1976.
Scanners had yet to be invented, and cashiers manually entered
prices.) My father alerted her to her mistake. She thanked him
and charged him the extra dollar.

I was dumbfounded! At the time, my weekly allowance was a
dollar. My father had just thrown away what it took me a week
to earn. So I said, “Dad, that was dumb. All you had to do was
keep your mouth shut and you could have saved a whole dollar.”
“Yes,” he replied, “but how I feel about myself is worth more
than a dollar.”

My memory of that event has followed me all my life. It helps me
decide how to handle situations in which I must determine the
right thing to do. It taught me that there is more to life than

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.