Improving the Performance of Government Employees: A Manager's Guide

Improving the Performance of Government Employees: A Manager's Guide

Improving the Performance of Government Employees: A Manager's Guide

Improving the Performance of Government Employees: A Manager's Guide

Synopsis

With public scrutiny intensifying every day, optimizing the performance of government employees and departments is more critical than ever before. And just as in the private sector, the key for managers is to understand how different management systems perform individually and interact with one another. This book examines the roles and challenges of structural and technical systems, information and decision-making processes, rewards systems, and human capital management, and shows managers how to:

• Deliver clear and consistent messages to all employees

• Position employees and units to provide the best possible service to the public

• Hold them accountable through clear expectations and measurable goals

• Work with a strong leadership team to maintain, adjust, and improve all procedures

Liff devotes a chapter to each system and discusses its impact on overall performance as well as how to work proactively and innovatively to implement changes that will make a big difference. Including real-world government case studies demonstrating dramatic change, the book is both an inspiration and a blueprint for substantial improvement within every facet of government work.

Excerpt

I first became exposed to the concept of organization systems design in the 1990s, when my office was seeking to undergo a fundamental change in its performance, culture, and approach. A new leader had arrived in our office, and he questioned the way we did business. He felt that, although we were doing pretty well, we could do a lot better, and, quite frankly, he wanted to modernize our approach to work.

Prior to that, I (and most of my peers) tended to both look at and manage performance in a very reactive manner; if there was a problem, I looked to see who was at fault and whom I should blame. As many other managers did, I tended to fault people for our performance problems and did not think to look more deeply at our management systems and how they interacted with each other.

At that time, I was unfamiliar with the thinking of the pio--

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