The Experience Effect: Engage Your Customers with a Consistent and Memorable Brand Experience

The Experience Effect: Engage Your Customers with a Consistent and Memorable Brand Experience

The Experience Effect: Engage Your Customers with a Consistent and Memorable Brand Experience

The Experience Effect: Engage Your Customers with a Consistent and Memorable Brand Experience

Synopsis

The decision to pay money for a product or service is often based on more than just the product or service itself. Consumers care deeply about the overall experience of the buying process: They respond to the marketing message, the advertising, the sales approach, the website, the interaction with company personnel, and more.

When all these elements come together to form a seamless experience, the customer is left with a feeling of satisfaction that ultimately builds loyalty. Jim Joseph calls this ideal combination the "experience effect," and in this book he shows how any business can create one for its brand. Filled with practical advice and real-life examples, The Experience Effect shows readers how to:

Understand their brand's target audience • Conduct more effective market research • Connect with customers on an emotional level • Establish appropriate and engaging customer touchpoints • Link digital and nondigital media • Perform a gap analysis of their brand's marketing • And more

Whatever the business, whatever the size, The Experience Effect will help companies create a simple yet powerful brand experience that resonates purpose fully,consistently, and continuously with customers.

Excerpt

We interact with brands all the time, whether we consciously realize it or not. Some brands we’ve been loyal to for years (like a favorite shampoo or pair of jeans), and some we are just discovering for the very first time (like a new enhanced water drink or a new electronic device). Some we don’t even know are brands (like our favorite singer or a local restaurant)! Our interactions can run the gamut from amazing to just okay to disappointing to completely horrible.

Like clicking on a banner ad that takes you to a website where you find the perfect item you didn’t even realize you wanted, in a cool color you didn’t even realize existed, and discovering that it comes with free shipping—coincidently only on orders placed that . . .

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