The Going Lean Fieldbook: A Practical Guide to Lean Transformation and Sustainable Success

The Going Lean Fieldbook: A Practical Guide to Lean Transformation and Sustainable Success

The Going Lean Fieldbook: A Practical Guide to Lean Transformation and Sustainable Success

The Going Lean Fieldbook: A Practical Guide to Lean Transformation and Sustainable Success

Synopsis

In Going Lean, author Stephen A. Ruffa introduced the groundbreaking principles of Lean Dynamics, revealing how leading companies go beyond chasing the most visible outcomes of lean to address the disconnects that cause operational waste to accumulate. Illustrated by compelling cases and clear examples, The Going Lean Fieldbook provides a logical structure and practical advice for applying lean principles throughout the organization.

Useful as a stand-alone implementation guide and as a training resource, the book maps out a set path toward reaching a series of critical transformation levels, detailing the activities and the hazards that can derail the journey at each point along the way. Readers will learn how to promote stability, consistency, and innovation by first conducting a "dynamicvalue assessment" and attaining the buy-in that is critical to making business improvements work.

Based on lessons of real-life firms from different industries that have successfully implemented lean methods, this is an in-the-trenches manual for anyone who wants to energize their organization.

Excerpt

For some readers, calling this a “fieldbook” will set the wrong expectation. To them, the term might imply a step-by-step guide to going lean; they might expect to find little more than a compilation of templates and checklists for implementing today’s proliferation of discrete tools and activities whose direct application seems too often interpreted as the path to “leaning” the corporation.

The Going Lean Fieldbook does not follow this model.

Those who read my previous book, Going Lean, will recognize that such a focus would not make much sense. Going Lean showed that a much more complex context exists; that using a direct, “cookbook” approach for applying the techniques and practices made famous by Toyota is not the answer. It showed that what might succeed in gaining quick benefits amid simpler, steady conditions does not scale up well to address vast operations producing complex products within a dynamic environment.

The fundamental challenge extends beyond removing waste that is most visible—activities, delays, or materials that consume time and resources but do not contribute value—or mapping value streams, or applying techniques to improve standardization and orderliness. Instead, moving forward first requires taking a step back—taking a fresh look at the business conditions, the corporate mindset, and the management framework within the complex and sometimes chaotic environment in which one must operate—and then addressing the reasons these cause waste to accumulate in the first place.

In other words, going lean is not a matter of tweaking the status . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.