Juvenile Homicide: Fatal Assault or Lethal Intent?

Juvenile Homicide: Fatal Assault or Lethal Intent?

Juvenile Homicide: Fatal Assault or Lethal Intent?

Juvenile Homicide: Fatal Assault or Lethal Intent?

Synopsis

Warley's work focuses on male-to-male violent juvenile encounters. Using a multi-perspective framework that encompasses strain theory, social disorganization theory, the subculture of violence thesis, as well as theories of criminal lethality and compulsory masculinity, background characteristics are assessed to delineate structural-cultural factors that dispose adolescent males to violence. Consideration is also given to crime characteristics that differentiate impulsive killing from premeditated homicide. Disentangling weapon instrumentality effect from offenders' intentionality is a primary concern. Results confirm theoretical predictions and empirical literature regarding male honor contest violence, as well as the independent affect of specific intent to do harm on incident outcome (i.e. aggravated assault vs. homicide) in violent, juvenile male-to-male encounters.

Excerpt

The killing of one human being by another is an egregious offense against society and public law. Be that as it may, youthful homicide offending is an obvious violation of propriety. the American conception of childhood is opposed to the notion of children engaging in such aberrant and forceful behavior. Still, juveniles in this country commit hundreds of homicides each year (Horowitz, 2000; Fox and Zawitz, 2007; Benekos and Merlo, 2008, 2010). Over the past few decades this phenomenon has become a major public concern, and recent school shootings in California, Colorado, Georgia, Arkansas, and Mississippi have solidified public fear (Lane, Cunningham, and Ellen, 2004; McGee, Carter, Williams and Taylor, 2005; Brennan and Moore, 2009).

Certainly, teen murder is not a monolithic event. There are different types of adolescent homicide, namely, mass murder, such as those by school shootings; familicide; thrill killing; acts of murder motivated by cultural hate; and urban street homicide. in addition, the correlates of juvenile murder are likely determined by the type of homicide (Lennings, 2004; Allen and Lo, 2010). That is, the demographic, predisposing, and situational characteristics of lethal school violence are distinct from those involved when young people kill their family members. Likewise, the correlates of drive-by murders and common street homicide in inner cities differ from those associated with homicides that result from hate crimes or thrill killings.

Notwithstanding the variations, urban street killing is by far the most commonly occurring type of juvenile (and adult) homicide in the . . .

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