Perfectly Able: How to Attract and Hire Talented People with Disabilities

Perfectly Able: How to Attract and Hire Talented People with Disabilities

Perfectly Able: How to Attract and Hire Talented People with Disabilities

Perfectly Able: How to Attract and Hire Talented People with Disabilities

Synopsis

More than 22 million of the almost 173 million working-age individuals in the United States have one or more disabilities. Perfectly Able offers practical guidance for companies large and small on how to hire and retain talented and motivated people from within this largely untapped pool of potential employees. Illustrated with enlightening personal stories, this one-of-a-kind book provides insight into what it's like to seek employment as an individual with a disability. Readers will discover how to: - Evaluate how suited their workplace environment is for disabled or different employees and what needs to be changed - Improve and sustain their workforce by hiring the best people, regardless of any disability or diversity issue - Effectively recruit, place, and develop individuals with disabilities who can contribute to their company's success - Embrace the differences among their workforce to add value to the organization "

Excerpt

I'm more convinced than ever there are basic misunderstandings on the part of both employers and job seekers with disabilities about what each other needs. These misunderstandings are holding back progress in dramatically improving the employment rate of individuals of working age with disabilities.

Why are there gaps in understanding between job seekers with disabilities and potential employers? Many of us may have simply taken roads more easily traveled than those we often bypass because we believe they’re perhaps more dangerous. Yet, those bypasses, we sometimes forget, can be more rewarding.

Here are some concrete examples.

As cited later in this book, more than four of ten respondents to the first-ever national study of self-employed people with disabilities said they chose the entrepreneurial route because they “needed to create their own job.” A similar number also said they had chosen self-employment with its flexible hours and working conditions “to accommodate a disability.”

These are just two findings from a study conducted by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research’s Research & Training Center on Rural Rehabilitation Services, connected with the University of Montana–affiliated Rural Institute on Disabilities.

“Research has shown that there are nearly as many people with dis-

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