Gilles Deleuze's Difference and Repetition: A Critical Introduction and Guide

Gilles Deleuze's Difference and Repetition: A Critical Introduction and Guide

Gilles Deleuze's Difference and Repetition: A Critical Introduction and Guide

Gilles Deleuze's Difference and Repetition: A Critical Introduction and Guide

Synopsis

A revised, expanded and fully up-to-date critical introduction to Deleuze's most important work of philosophy.

This second edition of Williams' classic text includes significant new material on the idea of intensity, Deleuze and science and questions of action after Difference and Repetition, all of which feed into current debates around Deleuzian practice in politics and ethics. He also engages with the recent foremost interpretations of Deleuze by Bryant, Sauvagnargues, Smith, Somers-Hall and de Beistegui which will help guide you through the key debates and oppositions. A final critical section introduces and gives brief descriptions of new works on Deleuze, contrasting the Williams reading with others.

This is an essential resource for anyone working on Deleuze and looking for new insights into his work.

Excerpt

There is a surprising and yet important role for a new sense of risk in Deleuze’s philosophy. in Difference and Repetition it appears through the concept of the ‘dice throw’. Any act is entangled with an event constituted by multiple precursors and influences which determine the act and to which it is passive. Nonetheless, the act retains freedom with respect to its destiny. This freedom is translated into action as a risky and experimental dice throw rolled within an event. the act can replay its forerunners and its situation in a novel ‘counter-actualisation’. It counters the determinations of the event in a new drama. This creative counter stages a re-enactment of the places and roles assigned to the act. It makes a new actual path for the event, consigning others to low degrees of virtual subsistence (Could have been a contender…).

The ‘it’ in this action and drama must not be associated with a free human being for two critical reasons. First, the power to introduce novelty and hence free-play into a system is not restricted to the human. Second, the location of novelty is never to be identified with a part of the event. So when small fissures on the face of a sacred building cohere to send a portentous frieze crashing to the ground, triggering a mass reaction to a desperate and unjust political state, the power to introduce novelty should not be associated with each political actor. It must be associated with a network of influences and counters responding to a new sign located in that facade then extended through society and history. (Each fissure is all of time… and so, therefore, is each actor.)

Without the sign there is neither human ‘freedom’ nor full historical ‘meaning’. Difference and Repetition is then doubly revolutionary. the book sets revolution at the heart of philosophy and . . .

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