Women, Migration, and Domestic Work on the Texas-Mexico Border

Women, Migration, and Domestic Work on the Texas-Mexico Border

Women, Migration, and Domestic Work on the Texas-Mexico Border

Women, Migration, and Domestic Work on the Texas-Mexico Border

Synopsis

Mendoza examines cross-border migration by Mexican women, who live in Mexico and work in domestic service in the U.S.. She finds that multiple factors such as age, financial stability, and previous work experience draw women to “migrate” across the border daily. In addition, gender, social class, and nationality transform the spaces they encounter crossing the border. These spaces shape the reception and the perception of their status as migrants. The legality of cross-border domestic workers fluctuates and is complicated by the “safe” and “risky” spaces they inhabit on their journey. Finally, Michele Lamont’s theory of symbolic boundaries is important to understand the relationship between Mexican American employers and Mexican employees at the border.

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