China's Christian Colleges: Cross-Cultural Connections, 1900-1950

China's Christian Colleges: Cross-Cultural Connections, 1900-1950

China's Christian Colleges: Cross-Cultural Connections, 1900-1950

China's Christian Colleges: Cross-Cultural Connections, 1900-1950

Synopsis

China's Christian Colleges explores the cross-cultural dynamics that existed on the campuses of the Protestant Christian colleges in China during the first half of the twentieth century. Focusing on two-way cultural influences rather than on missionary efforts or Christianization, these campuses, most of which were American-supported and had a distinctly American flavor, were laboratories or incubators of mutual cultural interaction that has been very rare in modern Chinese history. In this Sino-foreign cultural territory, the collaborative educational endeavor between Westerners and Chinese created a highly unusual degree of cultural hybridity in some Americans and Chinese. The thirteen essays of the book provide concrete examples of why even today, more than a half-century after the colleges were taken over by the state, long-lasting cultural results of life in the colleges remain.

Excerpt

An Overview of the Purpose and Approach of This Volume

In an age when words and concepts such as multiculturalism, diversity, internationalization, globalization, and others are tossed about in conversations and classrooms on college and university campuses and in the media, previous historical instances of national cross-cultural experiences should be of genuine interest to many, especially if the experience lasted for several decades and involved a number of individuals and institutions. Such a historical experience was part of the life of China’s Christian colleges during the first half of the last century. That experience is the subject of this book. A fresh look at the cross-cultural dynamics in which Americans and Chinese were involved during those years is well worth taking and will be both interesting and instructive.

This volume is a product of a project entitled “The American Context of China’s Christian Colleges,” funded by the Henry Luce Foundation, which included a research conference with prepared papers held at Wesleyan University in September 2003. This project consciously attempted to go beyond previous scholarship and thinking concerning the approximately half-century history of the sixteen colleges (thirteen Protestant, three Roman Catholic) established by foreign missions in China, all of which were merged into state institutions after 1950. The attempt was not to add to our knowledge of what the colleges did in China, who their students were, and such empirical issues, but to probe the cross-cultural phenomenon represented by these colleges, especially the Protestant ones, most of which had a distinctly American flavor. The 2003 conference was extremely fertile in conceptual explorations. The participants were from eight different countries or territories, and papers were presented by scholars from four different countries; three of the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.