Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Husserl, Laevinas, and Derrida

Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Husserl, Laevinas, and Derrida

Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Husserl, Laevinas, and Derrida

Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Husserl, Laevinas, and Derrida

Synopsis

From Husserl's account of protention to the recent turn to eschatology in "theological" phenomenology, the future has always been a key aspect of phenomenological theories of time. This book offers the first sustained reflection on the significance of futurity for the phenomenological method itself. In tracing the development of this theme, the author shows that only a proper understanding of the two-fold nature of the future (as constitution and as openness) can clarify the way in which phenomenology brings the subject and the world together. Futurity therefore points us to the centrality of the promise for phenomenology, recasting phenomenology as a promissory discipline.

Clearly written and carefully argued, this book provides fresh insight into the phenomenological provenance of the "theological" turn and the phenomenological conclusions of Husserl, Levinas, and Derrida. Closely examining the themes of protention, eschatology, and the messianic, it will be essential reading for anyone interested in phenomenology, philosophy of religion, deconstruction, or philosophical theology.

Excerpt

This book is indebted to a great number of people and to conversations that I have had over the years. I can mention only a few of them here, but know that the contributions from all those who have helped are greatly appreciated. I would like to thank the participants of the thirty-eighth and thirtyninth annual Husserl Circles for their comments on earlier versions of chapter 1 and what would become chapter 2. There are many other colleagues whose comments and discussions were invaluable to the completion of this book, especially Michael Kelly, Kascha Snavely, Noah MossBrender, Jerome Veith, and Philip Braunstein. Jack Caputo, Jeffrey Bloechl, Leonard Lawlor, John Panteleimon Manoussakis, and Richard CobbStevens were very patient in answering questions and offering opinions on earlier drafts, and the book is better because of it. Richard Kearney offered his encouragement and support numerous times at various stages of the process, and this book would not be here without his sage advice. For all of those mentioned, I thank you for your insights, your wisdom, and your friendship. I would also like to thank Helen Tartar, Thomas Lay, Stephen Barichko, and everyone at Fordham University Press for their work in getting this manuscript ready to be published. They have done much to improve the book, and any faults that remain are my fault, not theirs.

Finally, I would like to thank Tanya, who not only made it possible for me to finish this project but also made it, and my life in general, enjoyable and worthwhile.

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