Pragmatic Pluralism and the Problem of God

Pragmatic Pluralism and the Problem of God

Pragmatic Pluralism and the Problem of God

Pragmatic Pluralism and the Problem of God

Excerpt

Contemporary philosophy of religion is in a confusing state, as the different schools of thought seem to disagree not only about substantial questions such as God’s existence but about the very nature and methods of the philosophy of religion. These disagreements do not just arise from the theism versus atheism dispute about the existence of God or from the currently popular science versus religion controversy, to which aggressive atheists like Richard Dawkins and Daniel C. Dennett have actively contributed. Evidentialism and fideism offer different metalevel views on the justifiability of religious faith and on its relation to science and reason: while evidentialism urges that religious beliefs (like scientific ones) require justification in terms of general, religiously neutral criteria of rationality, fideism draws a sharp distinction between faith and reason, advancing faith in the absence of evidence.

In addition to this primarily epistemological debate, a metaphysical and semantic disagreement concerns the nature of religious “reality” and our ability to refer to it linguistically. Realists affirm the existence of a mind-, concept-, language-, theory-, and discourse-independent world . . .

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