Gillian Rose: A Good Enough Justice

Gillian Rose: A Good Enough Justice

Gillian Rose: A Good Enough Justice

Gillian Rose: A Good Enough Justice

Synopsis

Offering new perspectives on contemporary political theory, books in this series 'take on' the political in accordance with the ambivalent colloquial sense of the phrase - as both an acceptance and a challenge. They interrogate received accounts of the relationship between political thought and political practice, criticise and engage with the contemporary political imagination, and reflect on the ongoing transformations of politics. Concise and polemical, the texts are oriented towards critique, developments in Continental thought, and the crossing of disciplinary borders. Makes the case for the rediscovery of British philosopher Gillian Rose's unique but neglected voice Gillian Rose draws on idiosyncratic readings of thinkers such as Hegel, Adorno and Kierkegaard to underpin her philosophy, negotiating the 'broken middle' between the particular and the universal. While of the left, she is sharply critical of much leftwing thought, insisting that it shirks the work of coming to know and of taking political risk in pursuit of a 'good enough justice'. In this book Kate Schick presents the core themes of Rose's work and locates her ideas within central debates in contemporary social theory (trauma and memory, exclusion and difference, tragedy and messianic utopia), engaging with the work of Benjamin, Honig, Zizek and Butler. She shows how Rose's speculative perspective brings a different gaze to bear on debates, eschewing well-worn liberal, critical theoretic and post-structural positions.

Excerpt

Gillian Rose is an important, but neglected philosopher. She is neglected partly because she is a difficult thinker, who revels in the difficulty of her philosophy, and partly because she is a creative thinker, who falls outside established and easily defined schools of thought. This book makes a case for the timely intervention of Rose’s thought and introduces readers to its central themes, without stripping her work of the crucial element of struggle that is at its core. Rose’s writing is not easily accessible; however, it rewards extended engagement and has important things to say to the contemporary Left. While, like many on the Left, Rose is acutely aware of the poverty and hubris of liberalism, she does not allow the dominance of liberal thought to lead her into resignation. She refuses to let frustration with the liberal order push her into the pathways that other thinkers have taken, offering an acute critique of those who advocate a melancholic encircling of trauma, a resigned acceptance of tragedy, an inward-looking celebration of alterity or a messianic interruption of linear historical time. Instead, Rose draws on idiosyncratic readings of thinkers such as Hegel, Adorno and Kierkegaard to underpin a dogged insistence that rather than abandoning law or reason, we should pursue an agonistic negotiation of actuality with Hegelian inaugurated mourning at its core. in short, Rose is of the Left, but also sharply critical of much Left-wing thought, insisting that it shirks the work of coming to know and risking political action, in the hope that we might instantiate a ‘good enough justice’.

Rose’s unusual sources of philosophical inspiration and idiosyncratic readings of those philosophers mean that one cannot simply pick up her work and engage with it through familiar categories and theoretical concepts. She develops a speculative interpretation of . . .

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