The Art and Craft of Storytelling: A Comprehensive Guide to Classic Writing Techniques

The Art and Craft of Storytelling: A Comprehensive Guide to Classic Writing Techniques

The Art and Craft of Storytelling: A Comprehensive Guide to Classic Writing Techniques

The Art and Craft of Storytelling: A Comprehensive Guide to Classic Writing Techniques

Synopsis

Master the Power of Story

When you consider the thousands of years of storytelling that comprise our literary tradition, it's easy to feel overwhelmed by the shadow of so many works. But there are common threads that link all stories--from Beowulf and Hamlet to Gone With the Wind and The Godfather to the story you're drafting right now in your head. These threads form the foundation that supports story--a foundation Nancy Lamb shows you how to access and master.

Whether you're writing a novel, a memoir, or a screenplay, The Art and Craft of Storytelling offers time-tested ways to translate a concrete idea into a polished work. In this book, you will find strategies for:

  • Creating a successful a beginning, middle, and end while moving smoothly from one stage to the next
  • Crafting memorable characters, choosing the best point of view for your story, and constructing authentic, compelling dialogue
  • Integrating and navigating the more subtle elements of story, such as voice, tone, premise, and theme
  • Understanding genres and subgenres and how they apply to your story
  • Structuring plots that transform a ho-hum story into a page-turning read
The Art and Craft of Storytelling gives you all the tools you need to contribute your own story to our great tradition, to open new worlds to your readers, and to introduce new ways of thinking. This is the power and purpose of story. And by your writing, this is the tradition you honor.

Excerpt

Art begins with craft, and there is no art until
craft has been mastered
.

—Anthony Burgess

Storytelling is an art. And like any other art, it has rules. Picasso was trained in classical art before he became a cubist. In the beginning, he learned to draw people who looked like people. Once he mastered perspective and line and shading, he could create any number of variations on that portrait by juxtaposing the elements, distorting dimensions, or stacking the third (unseen) dimension on top of the first. Even when he turned his visual world upside down or inside out, he used the fundamentals of his classical training to achieve his goals.

Whether you’re writing a fanciful story coaxed from the ether, a memoir pulled from personal experience, or an outasight, neverbeen-done, experimental novel, the essence of storytelling remains the same. Good story flows from a solid understanding . . .

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