Doing Philosophy Personally: Thinking about Metaphysics, Theism, and Antiblack Racism

Doing Philosophy Personally: Thinking about Metaphysics, Theism, and Antiblack Racism

Doing Philosophy Personally: Thinking about Metaphysics, Theism, and Antiblack Racism

Doing Philosophy Personally: Thinking about Metaphysics, Theism, and Antiblack Racism

Excerpt

So long as we think of philosophy as a set of (one hopes) objective proposi
tions about nature, we will continue to be tempted by notions that philoso
phy can be a “science,” that there is a correct way of doing philosophy, that
a philosophical judgment or body of judgments can be true. If instead we
allow ourselves to think of philosophy as expression, these rigid demands
seem pointless or vulgar. Yet we surely do not want to reduce philosophy to
mere expression, to autobiography or poetry, to “subjective truth” or psy
chic discharge. Although it is an expression of personal attitude, a philo
sophical statement is better compared to a piece of statuary than to a feeling
or an attitude. The philosopher is a conceptual sculptor. He uses his lan
guage to give a shape to his prejudices and values, to give his attitude a life
of their own, outside of him, for the grasp of others…. The philosopher
builds insight onto insight, illustration into argument, joins metaphysical
slogan to concrete observation, perhaps using himself as an example, the
entire age as a foil.

—Robert C. Solomon

Ioccupy many social roles and have undergone many life-shaping events. I am the youngest son of the late James R. Tunstall and Delsie M. Tunstall; the father of two sons, Anthony Elijah and Christopher James; the husband of Crystal Nicole Scott-Tunstall; the uncle of eight surviving nieces and nephews, one of whom has a few children of her own; a friend to fewer than twenty people; an associate and colleague to many more people; an author of articles on a variety of topics, including aesthetics, Africana philosophy, pragmatism, religious ethics, and social and political philosophy; an author of a monograph on Josiah Royce’s ethico-religious insight, Yes, But Not Quite: Encountering Josiah Royce’s Ethico-Religious Insight; an assistant professor at Grand Valley State University; and someone who earned . . .

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