Cracking the New Job Market: The 7 Rules for Getting Hired in Any Economy

Cracking the New Job Market: The 7 Rules for Getting Hired in Any Economy

Cracking the New Job Market: The 7 Rules for Getting Hired in Any Economy

Cracking the New Job Market: The 7 Rules for Getting Hired in Any Economy

Synopsis

Everyone knows that safe jobs and lifelong careers are long gone. So why do most job seekers and employment experts cling to outdated tactics for landing a good position? The usual advice to capture career highlights in a ra©suma©, practice answers to standard interview questions, and do lots of face-to-face networking is the stuff of the past. Human resources insider R. William Holland delivers a completely new and radically improved set of rules for job hunters in today's very tough market, where white-collar positions are shed at higher rates than those in any other sector. The key is to shift your focus from what you've done in the past former job titles, duties, degrees-to the value you can create for an employer in the future. Value creation is the language employers respond to, and Cracking the New Job Market supplies powerful strategies for putting it to work for you, including how to: Gather information on what prospective employers truly value Tailor your ra©suma© and interview answers to speak directly to what companies value Locate prime employment opportunities that intersect with your personal talents and what the marketplace needs Unlock the networking power of social media And many more tips for cracking the new job market! Book jacket.

Excerpt

I first met Bill Holland in 2005, in Chicago, at a book signing for Bait and Switch— my attempt to understand and explain why otherwise perfectly qualified professionals were having difficulty finding work. Corporate downsizing was churning out tens of thousands of white-collar workers every year, but the resources available to people to help with the reemployment process didn’t make a lot of sense. It seemed to me that most of the coaching, networking groups, and the unemployment industry in general were part and parcel of one gigantic “bait and switch” scheme that too often did everything but help those who needed it the most. Unemployed white-collar workers had become a market for a host of dubious schemes, scams, and unhelpful self-help books and DVDs.

By the time my tour reached Chicago, it was clear that the themes of Bait and Switch resonated with substantial numbers of people who otherwise had no outlet for their concerns. Back then, no one wanted to believe that white-collar professionals were facing the same economic pressures more common to hourly workers. As I talked to different groups around the country, I began to ask who in the audience might be interested in organizing for purposes of giving voice to a new class of disaffected workers—white-collar America. That’s when United Professionals (UP) was born and Bill Holland stepped forward to become its chairman of the board.

Between 2006 and late 2010, UP reached out and touched thousands of people, many of whom shared their stories with us. Some had lost their homes, retirement savings, and any hope things would eventually get better. Most of the younger ones were laboring under more student debt than they could pay back in a lifetime. Many had given up on their professional careers and landed in low-paid service . . .

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