Rescue the Problem Project: A Complete Guide to Identifying, Preventing, and Recovering from Project Failure

Rescue the Problem Project: A Complete Guide to Identifying, Preventing, and Recovering from Project Failure

Rescue the Problem Project: A Complete Guide to Identifying, Preventing, and Recovering from Project Failure

Rescue the Problem Project: A Complete Guide to Identifying, Preventing, and Recovering from Project Failure

Synopsis

When budgets are dwindling, deadlines passing, and tempers flaring, the usual response is to browbeat the project team and point fingers of blame. Not helpful. For these situations, what is needed is an objective process for accurately assessing what is wrong and a clear plan of action for fixing the problem.

Rescue the Problem Project provides project managers, executives, and customers with the answers they require. Turnaround specialist Todd Williams has worked with dozens of companies in multiple industries resuscitating failing projects. In this new book, he reveals an in-depth, start-to-finish process that includes:

  • Techniques for identifying the root causes of the trouble
  • Steps for putting projects back on track audit the project, analyze the data, negotiate the solution, and execute the new plan
  • Nearly 70 real-world examples of what works, what doesn't, and why
  • Guidelines for avoiding problems in subsequent projects

Many books explain how to run a project, but only this one shows how to bring it back from the brink of disaster. And with 65% of projects failing to meet goals and 25% cancelled outright, that's essential information!

Excerpt

“When you are in a hole.…”

Most projects start well, and with perfectly good intentions. Before too long, however, many stray from this path, and the project team finds itself overwhelmed with too much to do, too little progress, and criticism from all directions. A standard response to this is to increase the pressure: “Work harder! Work faster! What are you—stupid?” This strategy rarely succeeds and often makes a bad situation even worse.

When a project is in trouble, increasing the chaos does not help. To restore order, you must first acknowledge that problems exist, and then step back to determine how best to bring the project under control. Todd Williams offers a wealth of proven practices to address this issue in Rescue the Problem Project, which outlines a process for recovering failing projects in clear and unambiguous terms. The steps for recovery—recognition, audit, analysis, negotiation, and reexecution—are applicable to troubled projects of nearly any type. The book provides ample guidance to assist you in tailoring the process to your specific needs.

Recovering failing projects requires help. Todd extensively addresses the support you will need, and he offers useful advice on how to secure it. You need help from the team that is presently engaged because its members know what is happening (and more often than not, what to do to fix it). You need help from management, customers, and other project stakeholders. You will probably also need help from outside the project to bring in the fresh perspective that recovery nearly always requires. You need all of this help because restoring a failing project to health inevitably depends on change. If you lack sufficient support, resistance to change will ultimately thwart all your recovery efforts. A project in motion tends to remain in motion, even when it is moving in the wrong direction.

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