Results without Authority: Controlling a Project When the Team Doesn't Report to You

Results without Authority: Controlling a Project When the Team Doesn't Report to You

Results without Authority: Controlling a Project When the Team Doesn't Report to You

Results without Authority: Controlling a Project When the Team Doesn't Report to You

Synopsis

It's tricky enough to spearhead a big project when you're the boss. But when you're the leader of a team of people who don't report to you, the obstacles are even greater. 'Results Without Authority' is the definitive book for project managers looking to establish credibility and. A groundbreaker in the field, it supplies a start-to-finish system for getting successful project results from cross-functional, outsourced, and other types of teams. The completely updated second edition includes new information on: -Agile methods and evolving project management tools -Strategies for working with virtual teams -Analytical versus "blink" decision processes - The use (and misuse) of social media in project environments - The myth of multitasking. For project leaders lacking clear-cut authority, getting everyone on board-and keeping them there-can be a challenge. 'Results Without Authority' is the must-have guide for getting the best results from your team.

Excerpt

PROJECTS ARE EVERYWHERE. Some of these projects succeed; others do not. Many projects fail because the project leader lacks sufficient control to keep things moving toward a successful conclusion. Insufficient project control is a result of many factors: lack of authority, geographically distributed teams, excessive project change, competing priorities, and inadequate planning—just to name a few.

Increasingly today, projects are undertaken in environments where the project leader has little formal authority. Even for project managers with formal authority, significant portions of project work are done by contributors who work for other managers, often for a different company. Projects where no one is in charge are almost certain to fail. As the leader of your project, you must assume control, whether or not you possess organizational authority. As unlikely as it may sometimes seem, any project leader can do much to establish and maintain project control. This book has many ideas for achieving project success using techniques that don’t depend on organizational position or on formal authority.

Who’s in Charge?

In classes, workshops, and informal discussions of project management that I’ve been a part of, one of the most common questions is, ‘‘How can I manage my project if I have no power or authority?’’ This issue comes up so often that . . .

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