The AMA Handbook of Business Writing: The Ultimate Guide to Style, Grammar, Usage, Punctuation, Construction, and Formatting

The AMA Handbook of Business Writing: The Ultimate Guide to Style, Grammar, Usage, Punctuation, Construction, and Formatting

The AMA Handbook of Business Writing: The Ultimate Guide to Style, Grammar, Usage, Punctuation, Construction, and Formatting

The AMA Handbook of Business Writing: The Ultimate Guide to Style, Grammar, Usage, Punctuation, Construction, and Formatting

Synopsis

Just because you're not a born writer doesn't mean you should settle for less than perfect business documents. After all, every piece you write reflects directly on the quality of the product or service your business offers. Now, this helpful guide takes the guesswork out of more than 50 commonly used business documents, including:
  • Reports
  • Proposals
  • Business plans
  • Presentations
  • Press releases
  • Memos
  • Email
  • Newsletters
  • Collection letters
  • Sales materials

Arranged alphabetically and cross-referenced for easier use, the book presents clear examples of how to (and how not to) create winning materials every time. The authors' step-by-step instructions begin with an overview of the writing process, from preparation and research right through to final review and publication. Sample documents show you how your pieces should look and read, and close to 300 individual entries cover key points of grammar, style and spelling, and present strategies for writing more clearly, avoiding bias, eliminating clichs, and much more.

Excerpt

Bad, Badly

Bad is an adjective and badly is an adverb. Use the adjective bad when referring to human feeling.

Example: I felt bad. [If you said, “I felt badly,” you’d be saying that
there was something wrong with your sense of touch.]

Badly is an adverb, but it is often mistakenly used as an adjective.

Incorrect: He wanted badly to go with them.

Correct: He wanted very much to go with them.

Incorrect: She felt badly after her operation.

Correct: She did not feel well after her operation.

Back-Channeling

In conversation, back-channeling is a natural response that shows you understand what a person is saying by using interjections such as I see, yes, okay, and uh-huh.

Backslash, Slash

The usual slash (/) is sometimes called a forward slash. Slashes are often used to indicate directories or folders in a computer filing system. Slashes are also used in Web addresses.

Example: http://www.videologies.com

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