Manager 3.0: A Millennial's Guide to Rewriting the Rules of Management

Manager 3.0: A Millennial's Guide to Rewriting the Rules of Management

Manager 3.0: A Millennial's Guide to Rewriting the Rules of Management

Manager 3.0: A Millennial's Guide to Rewriting the Rules of Management

Synopsis

Millennials mean business, and they are shaking up the workplace as they enter management roles for the very first time. They are tearing down the corporate ladder, communicating on the fly, and bringing play to work. Millennials are creative, big thinkers, and they will change the face of leadership--IF they can bridge the gap between the hierarchical management style of senior executives and the casual, more collaborative approach of their peers.

Manager 3.0 is the first-ever management guide for Millennials. They will master crucial skills such as dealing with difficult people, delivering constructive feedback, and making tough decisions--while gaining insight into the four generations in the workplace and how they can successfully bring out the best in each.

Packed with interviews and examples from companies like Zappos, Groupon, Southwest Airlines, and Google, Manager 3.0 will help these new managers enhance their unique talents while developing an effective leadership style all their own.

Excerpt

—George Orwell

I will never forget the day I came across my first leaderless team.

In my days as a Vice President/Director of Talent Acquisition at Leo Burnett, I was in charge of recruiting at all levels, but my main focus was entry-level candidates. I had the pleasure of reading more than 10,000 student resumes and interviewing more than 1,000 collegians. One of the standard interview questions I asked was, “Tell me about a group project you worked on in college.” I used this question when hiring for the account management department because a huge part of the job was working with diverse groups within the company. We wanted to hire people who had the ability to manage projects and lead teams.

I was seeking candidates who said that they took the role of leader within the group. I would then probe them about their ability to work on diverse teams, handle conflict effectively, and drive results for the group. I must have posed this question hundreds of times in my quest to find the best candidates.

I still remember the day it all changed. It was in the spring of 2001, and I was interviewing a student from Princeton. I asked my standard . . .

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