This Is How to Get Your Next Job: An Inside Look at What Employers Really Want

This Is How to Get Your Next Job: An Inside Look at What Employers Really Want

This Is How to Get Your Next Job: An Inside Look at What Employers Really Want

This Is How to Get Your Next Job: An Inside Look at What Employers Really Want

Synopsis

Even in a bad economy, companies have job openings they can't fill. Considering the millions of people who are out of work or unhappily employed, how can that be?What are job seekers doing to turn off employers? And what is it that employers want but aren't finding?


Leading career expert and syndicated columnist Andrea Kay asked employers one simple question: why didn't you hire the last ten people you interviewed? What it came down to, every time, wasn't a matter of skills or experience, but how applicants seemed based on what they said or did. From lack of preparation, to pushiness, to a subtly defensive attitude, it's the simple behaviors prospective employees exhibit before, during, and after interviews that stand between them and job offers.


Based on candid insights from real-life employers, and featuring a foreword by Richard Nelson Bolles, bestselling author of What Color Is Your Parachute?, this book helps job hunters take control of how they come across to the people in charge of hiring. From "20 Things You Should Never Do" to a "Would You Hire You?" test, This Is How to Get Your Next Job helps readers show hiring managers who they are and why they're the perfect fit for the job they seek.

Excerpt

If you are looking for a job, I recommend you read this book. But before we talk about why, I want you to think about what a strange practice this is: One author recommending the books of another author. It happens all the time. Why do authors recommend other authors, particularly those writing in the same field? You don’t find that happening in other arenas of the marketplace. Does Coca-Cola recommend Pepsi? Nope, it does not. In commerce, you don’t recommend a competitor’s product. And why? There is a simple rule operating here: Consumers only have a finite amount of money. If they spend it on a competing product, they have less to spend on you. Therefore, isn’t it mildly insane for authors to recommend that people spend their money on other authors’ books, rather than their own? Well, I can really only speak from my own experience. But for me it makes perfect sense. For three reasons.

First, overwhelm. The Book of Ecclesiastes, in the Old Testament, enunciated the problem: “Be warned, my son…. Of the making many books, there is no end….” To illustrate this sentence, as of August 2010, according to Google, there were 129,864,880 books in existence. Now, I have no idea how many of these books are in the . . .

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