Managing Agrodiversity the Traditional Way: Lessons from West Africa in Sustainable Use of Biodiversity and Related Natural Resources

Managing Agrodiversity the Traditional Way: Lessons from West Africa in Sustainable Use of Biodiversity and Related Natural Resources

Managing Agrodiversity the Traditional Way: Lessons from West Africa in Sustainable Use of Biodiversity and Related Natural Resources

Managing Agrodiversity the Traditional Way: Lessons from West Africa in Sustainable Use of Biodiversity and Related Natural Resources

Synopsis

Drawing on nearly ten years of research in West Africa --primarily Ghana --this book shows how farmers are using traditional food production methods that also cultivate and conserve biodiversity on their lands. The contributors highlight interventions by the United Nations University Project on People, Land Management, and Environmental Change (UNU/PLEC) for sustaining agrodiversity for rural livelihoods, as well as lessons for teaching, policy, and development planning.The volume provides valuable lessons for policymakers, practitioners, students, and teachers involved in agriculture, social science, biological science, and other studies relating to environmental or natural resources management and sustainable development.

Excerpt

This book is a product of work under the United Nations University Project on People, Land Management, and Environmental Change (modified to People, Land Management, and Ecosystem Conservation since 2002)–UNU/PLEC or PLEC, for short.

In 1994, barely a year after the inception of PLEC, its Scientific Advisory Group (SAG) wrote:

human and social demands make it necessary that maintenance of biodiversity has to be
accomplished within land use and agricultural systems in which farmers make use of a
wide range of both natural and domesticated plant species. PLEC gives emphasis to the
study of this agrodiversity, which is greatest among small-farming communities in the
tropics and sub-tropics. Many farmers use indigenous knowledge and initiative as well as
new information, to manage their land, waters and biota for production. Our [i.e. The
PLEC] objective is to draw lessons as to which techniques and types of land use best per
form the function of protecting natural resources, including the protection of a diversity of
gene pools from which tomorrow’s innovations may stem …

The ultimate [PLEC] aim is to provide researched options for the better management
of land and resources for small-scale producers. Effective management systems do not
have to be invented only by modern science. They exist, and have been continuously devel
oped by the world’s farmers. (Scientific Advisory Group, 1994)

The PLEC research across the tropical world confirms that inherent in used biophysical environments are indigenous, endogenous, local, or traditional practices that favour conservation of biodiversity through agrodiversity, i.e. agricultural diversification in all its forms–management diversity, agrodiversity, biophysical . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.