Teaching the Primary Curriculum

Teaching the Primary Curriculum

Teaching the Primary Curriculum

Teaching the Primary Curriculum

Synopsis

• What is good teaching and learning in the primary school? • How can teachers manage the whole curriculum and still educate the whole child and raise standards? • How can teachers be in critical dialogue with each other and with the curriculum in their search for improvement? • What is the role of the teacher in the new primary curriculum? This wide ranging book seeks to address these questions and to provide a comprehensive overview of the whole primary curriculum. It aims to develop teaching throughout primary education and to support teachers in the effective delivery of the curriculum. There is a particular focus on recent changes in primary education. The contributors consider how teaching methodologies need to adapt to these changes to meet the needs of children and raise standards in school. Throughout the book, emphasis is placed on effective teaching and learning methodologies, the importance of quality interaction in the classroom, the role of the teacher in teaching and learning and the experience of the child. Exemplars of good teaching are provided in each chapter, as well as thought provoking ideas for good practice.

Excerpt

To say that the last two decades have seen significant change in English (and Scottish, Welsh and Irish, but chiefly English) primary education is to invite a hollow laugh at the extent of the understatement. Teachers, those who educate and train them and above all pupils and their parents, inhabit a radically different educational environment from that of the early 1980s. This book is a response to this change.

Since before the introduction of the UK’s first National Curriculum in 1988 and during the welter of debate, disagreement, correspondence, conferences and training which preceded and followed it, primary practitioners have been involved in creating and responding to a revolution. Implementing new educational initiatives has become a way of life. At the same time a crisis has been developing in teacher morale and there has been a decline in their status and influence. the restoration of both depends on teachers’ dedicated pursuit of pupils’ educational entitlement and policy makers’ recognition of teachers’ expert contribution to progress and high standards. Everyone involved bears a responsibility for what happens next.

Responsibility is the unifying theme of this book, and is evident in advice on the implementation of the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies, in the explicit treatment of spirituality and morality in secular education and in many other ways besides. the editors’ responsibilities have included compiling a compendium which addresses the subject areas identified by the National Curriculum, but the contributions range far beyond this in their exploration of what constitutes sound . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.