Mysteries and Secrets of the Templars: The Story behind the Da Vinci Code

Mysteries and Secrets of the Templars: The Story behind the Da Vinci Code

Mysteries and Secrets of the Templars: The Story behind the Da Vinci Code

Mysteries and Secrets of the Templars: The Story behind the Da Vinci Code

Synopsis

Unsolved mysteries surround the remarkable men known as the Templars. Their ancient origins go back much further than their well-known adventures in the Middle East in the twelfth century. They knew that ancient secrets were waiting to be rediscovered and, perhaps, reactivated. They could generate labyrinthine codes - and decipher those that others had created in the remote past. But no real understanding of Templarism is possible without examining what became of their noble order after the treacherous attack of 1307. King Philip le Bel did not succeed in destroying all Templars - many escaped, including their fleet. Where did they go? Where are they now? What are their continuing purposes today?

Excerpt

Over its long life, the Christian faith has seen the rise of many influential movements and personalities. In the centuries yet to come, it will no doubt see many more. We can only wait in hope and expectation.

One such movement, coming early on in the history of the faith, would have limited appeal to most of us. Certain Christians, at that time, grew increasingly anxious about the wickedness of the world around them and the Church’s apparent complacent acceptance of ever-lowering standards of behaviour. In the face of what they saw as such a fall from grace, they decided to take no further part in any of it — resolving to opt out of what, if they had known the phrase, they would have called the “rat race.” They chose, deliberately, to isolate themselves, to live as hermits and adopt a lifestyle of extreme asceticism. To do so, they went into desert regions, hoping to live in isolation with God; but, in the event, many others who were like-minded were attracted to share their wildernesses. St. Anthony (AD 251–356) may have elected to live much of his long life in intended isolation, but over the years he had to share his desert life with others drawn to be part of the same experience. The way of life of these Desert Fathers, as they came to be called, led in later years to a worldwide monastic movement in which men and women vowed to a lifetime of obedience, poverty, discipline and chastity.

In a later century, other Christians took a very different attitude. Their resolve was not to distance themselves from their contemporary world but to stand and reason with it. Their aim was to overcome all false beliefs and behaviour with Christian logic and argument. Thomas Aquinas, a Dominican monk of the thirteenth century, steeped from an early age in the writings of Plato and Aristotle, accepted that Christianity came into the world by revelation and that, in the final analysis, some measure of faith would be needed to sustain it; nevertheless, he went on . . .

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