The Autism Spectrum and Further Education: A Guide to Good Practice

The Autism Spectrum and Further Education: A Guide to Good Practice

The Autism Spectrum and Further Education: A Guide to Good Practice

The Autism Spectrum and Further Education: A Guide to Good Practice

Synopsis

"This guide for professionals working with students with autism spectrum conditions (ASCs) in further education (FE) provides essential guidelines and practical advice on teaching young adults successfully and confidently. Christine Breakey emphasises the need to develop practical skills for use specifically in further education colleges. She discusses staff training, the importance of an inclusive specialist team, and person-centred strategies and solutions for teachers to communicate effectively, help their students to manage transition, understand and minimise the causes of ASC behaviours and to teach social skills and ASC self-awareness. The Autism Spectrum and Further Education is a key resource for professionals in FE institutions who have to meet the needs of young adults with ASCs."

Excerpt

Language is a fascination of mine. It is an extremely powerful tool and has the ability to change what people think. We use language to persuade and to influence people, as well as to describe to explain and to inform. The English language has been influenced by many other languages and as a result gives us a rich choice of vocabulary. Because of this we often have a range of words from which we can choose one which suits our purpose best. Words denote meaning, but they also carry connotations, which imply or suggest additional meaning. The word ‘red’ for example denotes colour, but the connotations of red are ‘danger’, ‘hot’, or ‘sexy’. Some connotations are positive, some are negative, and through their connotations, our choice of the words and the way we use language influences our perceptions of people and things. Because of this, I believe that we have a responsibility to use language very carefully and if we are serious about inclusion and equality, then we have a responsibility to ensure that we use language in a way which promotes that. This is not about being politically correct in our language use, as correctness without conviction is almost worthless. It is about using language in a way which does not exclude or marginalize people. It is about using ‘inclusive language’. Because of this, I have chosen to use the following terms throughout this book:

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