Deleuze and New Technology

Deleuze and New Technology

Deleuze and New Technology

Deleuze and New Technology

Synopsis

Explores how Deleuze's philosophy can help us to understand our digital and biotechnological futures In a world where our lives are increasingly mediated by technologies it is surprising that more attention is not paid to the work of Gilles Deleuze. This is especially strange given Deleuze's often explicit focus and reliance on the machine and the technological. This volume offers readers a collective and determined effort to explore not only the usefulness of key ideas of Deleuze in thinking about our new digital and biotechnological future but, also aims to take seriously a style of thinking that negotiates between philosophy, science and art.This exciting collection of essays will be of relevance not only to scholars and students interested in the work of Deleuze but, also, to those interested in coming to terms with what might seem an increasing dominance of technology in day to day living. Contributors William Bogard, Abigail Bray, Ian Buchanan, Verena Conley, Ian Cook, Tauel Harper, Timothy Murr

Excerpt

David Savat

Mark Poster closes this book with the observation that Deleuze never theorised new media, and, indeed, rarely made use of the term. As Poster points out, given France’s experiment with Minitel this may be an important point to make in the context of a book entitled Deleuze and New Technology. Opinion on the usefulness of Deleuze’s work with respect to theorising new technology diverges in this volume, ranging from scepticism about the use of Deleuze and Guattari’s concept of the rhizome in theorisations of the Internet, to critiques of Deleuze’s understanding of language as it concerns the idea of the concept, to explorations of how his work on an older technology such as film can offer valuable insights into new developments in neuroscience. As some contributors point out, since Deleuze died before the recent proliferation of new media it should come as no surprise that a large proportion of the essays in this book take as their starting point one of the few pieces in which Deleuze did engage specifically with new technology, namely his short essay entitled ‘Postscript on the Societies of Control’ (1992).

At the same time, Deleuze made obvious use of a concept of the machine throughout much of his work, and was at times directly engaged in considering specific technologies and the effect of their usage as a component or function within larger assemblages. in different ways Deleuze and Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus (1983) and A Thousand Plateaus (1987) are most representative in this regard, as well as Deleuze’s Foucault (1988), Cinema 1: the Movement-Image (1986), and Cinema 2: the Time-Image (1989), amongst others. in short, while Deleuze may not have devoted that much attention to so-called ‘new’ technology, and especially ‘new’ media–certainly less so and more negatively so than Guattari–his conceptualisation of technology and the machine, in both its material and its more abstract forms, is careful and considered, and plays a significant role in much of his work.

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