Rooted in Place: Family and Belonging in a Southern Black Community

Rooted in Place: Family and Belonging in a Southern Black Community

Rooted in Place: Family and Belonging in a Southern Black Community

Rooted in Place: Family and Belonging in a Southern Black Community

Synopsis

Through oral history, William W. Falk tells the story of an extended family in the Georgia-South Carolina lowcountry. Family members talk about schooling, relatives, work, religion, race, and their love of the place where they have lived for generations. This "conversational ethnography" argues that an interconnection between race and place in the area helps explain African Americans' loyalty to it. In Colonial County, blacks historically enjoyed a numerical majority as well as deep cultural roots and longstanding webs of social connections that, Falk finds, more than outweigh the racism they face and the economic disadvantages they suffer.
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