Willa Cather's New York: New Essays on Cather in the City

Willa Cather's New York: New Essays on Cather in the City

Willa Cather's New York: New Essays on Cather in the City

Willa Cather's New York: New Essays on Cather in the City

Synopsis

"This first facts established in Willa Cather's New York are those concerning Cather's familiarity with the city scene before she moved into it, and the importance of locations she moved through daily, once she arrived. Among those locations, the centrally important ones were where she first lived, in Washington Square, and where she first worked, at McClure's Magazine. Both of these sites are replicated in her fiction. But she doesn't arrive in them as a tabula rasa. She had been interested in medicine from her adolescence, as she continued to be until she died. That interest infuses her cityscapes from her earlier stories." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Countless people in museums, libraries, and homes across the nation, indeed trans-Atlantically, have helped the twenty contributors to this volume to prepare their materials, and therefore to make this book idea into a fact. To all of them, our single and collective thanks.

For permissions to reprint the illustrations essential to our volume, we thank the following: the British Library for The Eruption of Vesuvius in 1767 by Pietro Fabris 681K13; James Camner for the photograph of Olive Fremstad; Columbia School of Architecture for the photograph of the (now demolished) Singer Tower at 149 Broadway; the Corcoran Gallery of Art for The New York Window by Childe Hassam; Whitney Cox for the photograph of the Church of the Ascension at Fifth Avenue and 10 St.; the gte Corporation for the photograph of the Old Metropolitan Opera House at Broadway and 39 St.; the Historical Society of the Town of Greenwich for Cather materials held in their Holley House Collections; the Metropolitan Museum of Art for Winter in Union Square and Fifth Avenue Noon by Childe Hassam; the Museum of Modern Art for Girl with a Mandolin and Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso; the National Gallery of Art for Allies Day, May 1917 by Childe Hassam; the New York Historical Society for the photograph of Madison Square Park Looking Northeast from Fifth Avenue and 23 St.; the Omaha Public Library for the portrait of Willa Cather by Leon Bakst; the Philadelphia Museum of Art for Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2; the Phillips Collection for Washington Arch, Spring by Childe Hassam; Schweizwerische Stiftung für die Photographie for Naples by Wilhelm von Gloeden; the Smith College Museum for Union Square in Spring and Street Scene, Christmas Morning by Childe Hassam; the Underwood Photo Archives for the photograph of the Cloisters at the time of its purchase by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1925.

Beyond specific permissions and services, however, we wish to express our hearty gratitude to those who helped with the mechanics of computer-driven editing, by far the most harrowing part of this book’s production. Ray Semiraglio, head of the Faculty Development Lab of Drew University, and his staff patiently dealt with what felt like Emergency Room anxieties traceable to computer snicksnarls, all of which seemed life-threatening at the time they appeared. Without the lab and its staff, no book. We also cheerfully acknowledge the . . .

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