The Strange Death of Marxism: The European Left in the New Millennium

The Strange Death of Marxism: The European Left in the New Millennium

The Strange Death of Marxism: The European Left in the New Millennium

The Strange Death of Marxism: The European Left in the New Millennium

Synopsis

The Strange Death of Marxism seeks to refute certain misconceptions about the current European Left and its relation to Marxist and Marxist-Leninist parties that existed in the recent past. Among the misconceptions that the book treats critically and in detail is that the Post-Marxist Left (a term the book uses to describe this phenomenon) springs from a distinctly Marxist tradition of thought and that it represents an unqualified rejection of American capitalist values and practices. Three distinctive features of the book are the attempts to dissociate the present European Left from Marxism, the presentation of this Left as something that developed independently of the fall of the Soviet empire, and the emphasis on the specifically American roots of the European Left. Gottfried examines the multicultural orientation of this Left and concludes that it has little or nothing to do with Marxism as an economic-historical theory. It does, however, owe a great deal to American social engineering and pluralist ideology and to the spread of American thought and political culture to Europe. American culture and American political reform have foreshadowed related developments in Europe by years or even whole decades. Contrary to the impression that the United States has taken antibourgeois attitudes from Europeans, the author argues exactly the opposite. Since the end of World War II, Europe has lived in the shadow of an American empire that has affected the Old World, including its self-described anti-Americans. Gottfried believes that this influence goes back to who reads or watches whom more than to economic and military disparities. It is the awareness of American cultural as well as material dominance that fuels the anti-Americanism that is particularly strong on the European Left. That part of the European spectrum has, however, reproduced in a more extreme form what began as an American leap into multiculturalism. Hostility toward America, however, can be transformed quickly into extreme affection for the United States, which occurred during the Clinton administration and during the international efforts to bring a multicultural society to the Balkans. Clearly written and well conceived, The Strange Death of Marxism will be of special interest to political scientists, historians of contemporary Europe, and those critical of multicultural trends, particularly among Euro-American conservatives.

Excerpt

Among those acquaintances I wish to acknowledge for reading parts or all of my text or providing research information are Drs. David Brown, David Gordon, Will Hay, James Kurth, W. Wesley McDonald, Stanley Michalak, Martha Pennington, Gabriel Ricci, Paul Craig Roberts, Wayne Selcher, and Joseph Stromberg. Two German scholars who have spared me the need to travel more extensively in search of data are Stefan Hernold and Guido Hülsmann. Their e-mail communications benefited me immensely as I was working on my many footnotes. My former colleague, Professor Emeritus Frederick Ritsch, did more than simply go through my material in earlier drafts. He also shared with me the books and reams of notes he had collected on postwar French Communism, an intricate subject that Professor Ritsch had once intended to treat in a monograph. With due acknowledgment, I have incorporated his arguments about the essentially non-Marxist character of French Communist intellectuals. a young economist, Ian Fletcher, checked the accuracy of my statistics. Where our sources diverged, I often readily deferred to his superior judgment. Finally, my colleague and, unlike me, a computer specialist Kathryn R. Kellie imposed technical consistency on my pages, which had offered a truly astonishing variety of fonts and margin spaces.

I am also indebted to my recently deceased friend Paul Piccone, longtime editor of Telos, for having ferociously debated with me the topics broached in this work and in the two preceding volumes . . .

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