Reshaping the University: New Relationships between Research, Scholarship and Teaching

Reshaping the University: New Relationships between Research, Scholarship and Teaching

Reshaping the University: New Relationships between Research, Scholarship and Teaching

Reshaping the University: New Relationships between Research, Scholarship and Teaching

Synopsis

Discusses the relationship between research, teaching and scholarship in universities. This book offers ideas and evidence of practices that suggest a re-shaping of the University. It also addresses global issues.

Excerpt

Mark Hughes

The debate about research and teaching relationships is neither new nor UK-specific. However, the debate has come to have significant implications in terms of research and teaching policy making at both national and institutional level. If research does inform teaching and, more specifically, has a positive impact upon the quality of teaching, then this may be used as an argument for increasing the funding of research. If the opposite is true, then there may be a case for diverting funding from research to teaching. Similarly, relationships between teaching and research have implications in terms of organization of universities and their departments. Evidence of a relationship between research and teaching would suggest the need to locate research and teaching closely together, whereas evidence of a lack of a relationship would support the notion of research-only and teaching-only institutions.

Ramsden and Moses (1992: 273) suggested that ‘few beliefs in the academic world command more passionate allegiance than the opinion that teaching and research are harmonious and mutually beneficial’. While they remain sceptical and even offer empirical evidence to challenge this belief, interest in research and teaching relationships continues ‘fuelled [in the UK] by factors such as changes in central funding policy, the performance appraisal of academic staff, the role of the “new” universities, and the pressures created by the Research Assessment Exercise’ (Breen and Lindsay 1999: 75).

To inform this chapter, I reviewed some of the recent literature to establish what is known about relationships between teaching and research in higher education, by focusing mainly upon papers published in four leading higher education refereed journals: Higher Education, Higher Education Quarterly, Higher Education Review and Studies in Higher Education. These particular journals were chosen because ‘they are, arguably the most prestigious specialist journals for those academics writing on higher education that are . . .

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