Succeeding in College with Asperger Syndrome: A Student Guide

Succeeding in College with Asperger Syndrome: A Student Guide

Succeeding in College with Asperger Syndrome: A Student Guide

Succeeding in College with Asperger Syndrome: A Student Guide

Synopsis

"College life is particularly stressful for students with Asperger Syndrome. This much needed guide provides information to help these students prepare successfully for study, interact with staff and fellow students, cope with expectations and pressures, and understand their academic and domestic responsibilities." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

If you ask anyone with a college qualification what they recall about their first few days in college it will probably be their sense of excitement, wonder and anxiety. It is quite natural to feel a little intimidated by moving from high-school education on to college. Larger buildings set into larger landscapes with greater numbers of people than ever encountered before will intimidate even the best of us at times. As a new student, you’re an explorer in large unfamiliar territory. Even if your chosen college is right next door, stepping through its gates or onto its campus in your official capacity of undergraduate student brings new challenges. Eventually, the ‘newness’ of the environment gives way to familiarity. New friendships are made. New obligations are accepted, and a new set of responsibilities for oneself is discovered. Attending college is one particular type of transition from the stricter monitoring of the school environment to the looser, more independent environment of early adulthood.

It must be emphasized that the college environment is primarily a learning environment. Students come to college to study, pass their exams and move on to a career. How one behaves and what choices one makes socially can impact on performance. Like it or not, this new environment brings with it choices, expectations and obligations that require the exercise of a range of coping skills. Some of these skills are intellectual: Can I cope with the workload in my chosen subject areas? Some are simply focused around preserving one’s personal health: What do I do if I feel ill? Others are predominantly social: How do I make friends? A large range of . . .

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