Rethinking Risk: How Companies Sabotage Themselves and What They Must Do Differently

Rethinking Risk: How Companies Sabotage Themselves and What They Must Do Differently

Rethinking Risk: How Companies Sabotage Themselves and What They Must Do Differently

Rethinking Risk: How Companies Sabotage Themselves and What They Must Do Differently

Synopsis

It's a given factor in the operation of any organization. From corporate fraud and security issues to technological and other man-made disasters, bad things do happen. And while many businesses build elaborate defenses against these unexpected occurrences, often employing powerful technology to help detect and prevent them, most risk-assessment strategies fail to connect the dots before it's too late.

This book, based on the author's extensive experience analyzing the sources of corporate and organizational failure, reveals how a company can mitigate risk using available resources, including what may be the most important asset: its people. Readers will discover valuable strategies, enabling them to:

Draw "actionable intelligence" from enormous amounts of data • Quickly make better-informed assessments and decisions • Tap into the rich human sources of information that can directly alert them to signs of risk • Do a better job of anticipat ing and avoiding problems

Filled with practical, real-world insight and featuring interviews with experienced risk practitioners, this book will help any business recognize the first signs of trouble.

Excerpt

“People don’t call us because they’re having a great day.”

Anonymous

This is an accepted mantra in my business, along with “Did you ever hear of anybody stealing a million dollars and working their way down?”

I have spent more than forty-two years dealing with various forms of risk, and along the way I have seen more than a few things. I also learned a few lessons through the bitter experience of others.

Organizational problems are a fact of life, and few of them get smaller with time. Once a problem develops, it tends to grow, usually until it is too large to hide; then, one day, the organization senses it, goes into a panic mode, and picks up the phone.

When asked what I do for a living, I often jokingly reply, “Fix train wrecks.”

Unfortunately, that’s pretty much all I see—train wrecks. I am sure the vast majority of corporations and organizations work just . . .

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