Zen and Psychotherapy: Integrating Traditional and Nontraditional Approaches

Zen and Psychotherapy: Integrating Traditional and Nontraditional Approaches

Zen and Psychotherapy: Integrating Traditional and Nontraditional Approaches

Zen and Psychotherapy: Integrating Traditional and Nontraditional Approaches

Synopsis

Exploring the role of spirituality and religion in treatment, this book provides a sound clinical and academic rationale for exploring incorporating principles of Zen in traditional psychotherapy.

The authors, one a clinical educator and social scientist, the other a nurse psychotherapist and practicing Buddhist present a fascinating dialog on the "science" and the "art" sides of the art-science debate. Practical suggestions are included for achieving a balance between these two poles of the helping and healing process.

Excerpt

Between us, Joan and I have been in the mental health field in one way or another for some 80 years now. We have worked with many mental health disciplines and we have done that in a large number of settings, as we describe in the book. Although we certainly have not seen it all, we do have some sense of what the typical clinician, supervisor, or clinical educator is likely to encounter. Perhaps more important, both of us value the willingness to look at mental health work from different perspectives. For instance, I was first exposed to the field as a young bystander who witnessed a family member go through many lengthy periods of psychiatric treatment in the 1950s, when large state hospitals, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and firstgeneration psychotropics were still mainstream. Undergraduate school at Michigan State University exposed me to behavioral psychology and going on to work in medical settings also introduced me to the biological perspective. Both perspectives emphasize an empirical approach to understanding and treating behavior. During graduate school, however, I trained in ExistentialPhenomenological Psychology at Duquesne University, which took a nearly opposite point of view because it emphasizes meaning, human experience, and the possibility of free will. In between those two periods, I also explored such things as working in automobile factories, landscaping, Transcendental Meditation and Tai Chi, and writing. Today, I have learned that I am known as a professor who seems rigorous to students, although I may not appear to be that way to some colleagues in nonclinical areas of psychology.

In a certain sense, this background gave rise to the book. For one thing, I have always been caught by the push and pull of the empirical and the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.