Professional Knowledge, Professional Lives: Studies in Education and Change

Professional Knowledge, Professional Lives: Studies in Education and Change

Professional Knowledge, Professional Lives: Studies in Education and Change

Professional Knowledge, Professional Lives: Studies in Education and Change

Synopsis

Professional Knowledge, Professional Lives sets out to examine the state of professional knowledge with regard to teaching and teacher education. The current situation of professional knowledge is scrutinised with particular regard to the location of educational study within the faculties of education. The fate of disciplinary patterns of study, which have come under attack from the proponents of more practical perspectives, are also examined.Practical perspectives promoted by a wide spectrum of advocates have become part of the fashionable discourse around teacher education recently. These perspectives are interrogated and some of the results of such practical fundamentalism are held up for scrutiny. The author argues that confining professional knowledge entirely within the practical domain would not seem to be a well-thought out strategy for raising professional standards. A more active notion of teachers' professional knowledge can, and should, be explored and consolidated by work which focuses on the teacher's life and work, using more reflective and 'public intellectual' modes.

Excerpt

Teaching today is increasingly complex work, requiring the highest standards of professional practice to perform it well (Goodson and Hargreaves 1996). It is the core profession, the key agent of change in today’s knowledge society. Teachers are the midwives of that knowledge society. Without them, or their competence, the future will be malformed and stillborn. In the United States, George W. Bush’s educational slogan has been to leave no child behind. What is clear today in general, and in this book in particular, is that leaving no child behind means leaving no teacher or leader behind either. Yet, teaching too is also in crisis, staring tragedy in the face. There is a demographic exodus occurring in the profession as many teachers in the ageing cohort of the Boomer generation are retiring early because of stress, burnout or disillusionment with the impact of years of mandated reform on their lives and work. After a decade of relentless reform in a climate of shaming and blaming teachers for perpetuating poor standards, the attractiveness of teaching as a profession has faded fast among potential new recruits.

Teaching has to compete much harder against other professions for high calibre candidates than it did in the last period of mass recruitment-when able women were led to feel that only nursing and secretarial work were viable options. Teaching may not yet have reverted to being an occupation for ‘unmarriageable women and unsaleable men’ as Willard Waller described it in 1932, but many American inner cities now run their school systems on high numbers of uncertified teachers. The teacher recruitment crisis in England has led some schools to move to a four-day week; more and more schools are run on the increasingly casualized labour of temporary teachers from overseas, or endless supply teachers whose quality busy administrators do not always have time to monitor (Townsend 2001).

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.