Order and Disorder: The Health Implications of Eating and Drinking in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium of the International Commission for Research Inot European Food History, Aberdeen 1997

Order and Disorder: The Health Implications of Eating and Drinking in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium of the International Commission for Research Inot European Food History, Aberdeen 1997

Order and Disorder: The Health Implications of Eating and Drinking in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium of the International Commission for Research Inot European Food History, Aberdeen 1997

Order and Disorder: The Health Implications of Eating and Drinking in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium of the International Commission for Research Inot European Food History, Aberdeen 1997

Synopsis

A collection of nineteen papers on aspects of the health implications of eating and drinking, a most important subject for the present day. The papers for the most part are set against a background against which present-day problems can be judged, and bring us face-to-face with current harsh realities.

Excerpt

This volume contains the proceedings of the fifth symposium of the International Commission for Research into European Food History, hosted by The Rowett Research Institute, Aberdeen, Scotland, from 18–21 September 1997. It was organised by The European Ethnological Research Centre, Edinburgh, with the financial support of:

The Russell Trust
The Scotland Inheritance Fund
Macphie of Glenbervie
The Wellcome Trust
Paterson Arran Ltd

Since four of the papers are concerned with the work of the late Sir John Boyd Orr, the Rowett Research Institute, under its Director Professor Philip James, was a very appropriate setting. The then External Affairs Manager, Mrs Christine Cook, was an energetic on-the-spot organiser who facilitated the smooth running of the Symposium.

Thirteen countries were represented and nineteen papers are presented here on aspects of the health implications of eating and drinking, a most important subject for the present day. The Guest Speaker was Professor Hugh Pennington, Head of the University of Aberdeen’s Department of Medical Microbiology, who has been playing a national role in relation to current and recent food crises. Although the development of European food patterns from the early nineteenth century to the present day has virtually eradicated deficiency diseases related to poverty and lack of hygiene, nevertheless major health problems arise from the modern food pattern, such as obesity, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and cancer, largely as a result of over-nutrition. The Symposium fulfilled one of the roles of the members of the International Commission for Research into Food History by looking in an interdisciplinary way at the development of food and nutrition in different countries of Europe, especially over the last two centuries. The papers, therefore, help for the most part to set the background against which present day problems can be judged, whilst that of Hugh Pennington brings us face to face with current harsh realities.

The papers are divided into broad headings. The Guest Lecture by Professor Pennington presents a somewhat frightening aspect of the modern scene. Four papers deal with questions of nutrition raised by the work of Sir John Boyd Orr and the Carnegie Survey. Eleven deal with food consumption and biological standards, the development of nutrition and health . . .

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