Linked Histories: Postcolonial Studies in a Globalized World

Linked Histories: Postcolonial Studies in a Globalized World

Linked Histories: Postcolonial Studies in a Globalized World

Linked Histories: Postcolonial Studies in a Globalized World

Synopsis

During the past two decades, postcolonial studies has proven to be one of the fastest growing fields of critical inquiry. Postcolonialism has established itself as an important specialist field within literature disciplines, and it has strong resonances across other disciplines (history, sociology, anthropology, geography, cultural studies), and is a field which has inspired genuinely interdisciplinary research. The essays collected from the journal ARIEL (A Review of International English Studies) in Linked Histories take up some of the most pressing issues in postcolonial debates: the challenges which new theories of globalization present for postcolonial studies, the difficulties of rethinking how "marginality" might be defined in a new globalized world, the problems of imagining social transformation within globalization. The editors goal in bringing together this collection of articles is not to provide any definitive statement on these urgent questions; rather, it is to assemble a group of essays which "think through" the issues, and which therefore has the potential to move the discipline forward. The contributors represented include a balance of senior scholars with international reputations and scholars who represent the next generation.

Excerpt

In the spring of 2000, marking the twenty-fifth anniversary of the end of the Vietnam war, a Toronto newspaper published a story about the new economy of that formerly ravaged country. Journalist Miro Cernetig began the account by describing a familiar and conventionalized image of the Third World: on the outskirts of Hanoi, visitors are met by peasant farmers who hold out plastic bags, calling “Buy! Buy!” But the bags do not contain the expected produce from local fields; rather, they are filled with golf balls, carefully recovered from the grasses around a newly constructed course that was built as a joint venture with the South Korean company Daewoo. The club’s membership - mostly Japanese, American, and French, with some newly wealthy Vietnamese - invokes the successive imperialisms that have marked Vietnam, while the name of the Scottish golf pro Ian Fleming ironically recalls the author whose James Bond thrillers popularized a nostalgically orientialized view . . .

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