Induction: Fostering Career Development at All Stages

Induction: Fostering Career Development at All Stages

Induction: Fostering Career Development at All Stages

Induction: Fostering Career Development at All Stages

Synopsis

Induction is a broad concept which is applicable to teachers at several career stages. The authors explore past and current findings on the early experience of teachers as they arrive in new posts. They set these experiences into the policy framework and practice of induction within a context of changing work and career patterns with themes of changing conceptions and practices of professional development. Planned induction may be seen as an idea whose time came for beginning teachers in Scotland at the turn of the new millennium. However the future sustenance and development of induction will require continuing commitment, if it is to avoid becoming ossified within a relatively static framework for professional development.

Excerpt

In this book we explore the experience of induction: what it is for, how it is done and why. the concept of induction has recently been hijacked in education and has been used exclusively to refer to beginning teachers, but induction as a process has been widely studied beyond teaching and well beyond early beginnings in work. There has also been a tendency to see it as a bounded experience in teaching, framed by a set period of time and the provision of resources for support and a set standard to be achieved. in this book induction will be considered as playing a role in enabling career transitions, characterised by all the variation and uncertainties that accompany individual change. From the wider study of induction it is clear that effective induction is a multi-stage process that makes significant demands on all staff who are involved. It may be understood as an entitlement and as good human resource management practice and as a force for development and for retention.

At a time when there is concern about retention in teaching and when the demographics of the profession inevitably mean many new staff will be entering teaching, induction policy and practice become high stakes in ensuring as adequate supply of teachers who are committed and supported in their professional development. the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development study (OECD, 2002, p. 169) notes ‘Teacher policy needs to ensure that teachers work in an environment which facilitates success.’ Studies of induction reveal that there are real differences in teacher experiences and especially in teacher experiences in the early time in a new post. For many, there is a greater likelihood of early difficulties rather than early success being experienced, and this is an unwelcome situation especially given the established link between early success and teacher retention (Johnson and Birkeland, 2003).

In its developed form, transition at work is seen as having several dimensions that have direct implications for induction systems. New staff need to be socially integrated into the work group or professional community. They need help to ‘learn the ropes’, they have professional development needs that need to be met and the process of changing post may impact on their . . .

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