Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe: Representation and the Loss of the Subject

Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe: Representation and the Loss of the Subject

Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe: Representation and the Loss of the Subject

Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe: Representation and the Loss of the Subject

Synopsis

This is the first full-length book in English on the noted French philosopher Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe. Martis introduces the range of Lacoue-Labarthe's thinking, demonstrating the systematic nature of his philosophical project. Focusing in particular on the dynamic of the loss of the subjectand its possible post-deconstructive recovery, he places Lacoue-Labarthe's achievements in the context of related philosophers, most importantly Nancy, Derrida, and Blanchot.

Excerpt

A study of Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe confronts peculiar difficulties. For some nearly thirty years now, his writing on literature and philosophy has been as highly praised for its distinctiveness and precision as it has been critically unplumbed. To read Typography, for instance, is to discover an original voice on questions ranging from mimesis to music, from autobiography to dramatic catharsis. And it is the same with other work he has produced—not prolifically, but penetratingly, with an at once refreshing and rigorous approach to questions central to Western philosophy in the wake of Heidegger. Particularly as these questions touch the subject of philosophy—that is, the subject stubbornly lodged between philosophy and literature, and resistant alike to identification and dismissal within either— Lacoue-Labarthe’s is clearly a promising angle of access and address.

Yet there has been to date no book on Lacoue-Labarthe, and barely an extended scholarly article dealing with his thought on its own terms. This paucity contrasts with the abundance of material illuminating others with whom he shares a “family atmosphere,” as the late Jacques Derrida called it: the hundreds of texts on Derrida himself and the growing profusion of writings on Jean-Luc Nancy, Lacoue-Labarthe’s colleague and coauthor.

In redressing, to a small extent, this imbalance, I have been mindful of the probable reasons for it. Lacoue-Labarthe’s journeys in reflection and criticism are as complex as they are satisfying. Typically . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.