Managing the Aftermath of Radical Corporate Change: Reengineering, Restructuring, and Reinvention

Managing the Aftermath of Radical Corporate Change: Reengineering, Restructuring, and Reinvention

Managing the Aftermath of Radical Corporate Change: Reengineering, Restructuring, and Reinvention

Managing the Aftermath of Radical Corporate Change: Reengineering, Restructuring, and Reinvention

Synopsis

"Dr. Geisler lists the problems associated with radical change and describes the futility of total corporate transformations in general. In addition, he develops a staged process by which managers can counteract side effects of radical change programs. By showing that the beneficial effects of radical corporate change are usually transient, Dr. Geisler's process is a key ingredient in any effort designed for the long-term survival of the firm and the preservation of its strategic goals and methods. Thus, not only does Geisler provide a sound, well-reasoned criticism of corporate restructuring, but he offers something that few if any other books can offer: a workable means to cope constructively with the effects of its many failures." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

This book was bom as a response to the need for a hands-on book on the aftermath of radical change for managers of reengineered corporations. My main purpose in writing this book is to help the manager to better understand the radical corporate changes that reengineering has caused. Since the early 1990s American work organizations have undergone radical transformations—under the umbrella of Business Process Reengineering—which have resulted in massive downsizing and a host of other side effects.

Much of what has been written recently by academics and consultants alike, has been directed at improving the reengineering intervention. I’ll be using this term “intervention” throughout the book to describe the total phenomenon of reengineering. Some writers have looked at why certain aspects of reengineering have failed and others even offered some partial solution.

But the task has remained unaccomplished. American corporations have “downsized,” “rightsized,” redesigned their work processes, and improved dramatically their bottom lines in an economy that kept interest rates low and the stock market booming.

As I took a sabbatical from my academic position in early 1996 and went about my business of managerial consulting, I too often encountered large and midsize corporations in the period following the reengineering exercise or intervention. Many resembled a battlefield after a decisive battle. Some managers who still remained in their positions were increasing their productivity and resembled hyperactive beavers. Others just went about their work among the ruins of what used to be their departments, counting and mourning those terminated.

Everybody had questions, and almost nobody clearly understood why all this happened. More important, I was bombarded with questions such as: What now? How do we reorganize? lick the wounds? regroup?

The focus of this book is twofold: first, to describe and explain the consequences and aftermath of the reengineering intervention—the side effects on the organization and its managers; second, to advise executives at all levels of the organization of steps for cleaning up after the intervention and for restoring stability to the shattered organization.

With this book I wish to give the reader a valuable perspective on what happened in the organization and what to do in the aftermath of radical corporate change. The value added to the reader is a much better understanding of his or her corporate surroundings and possession of a workable framework to restore balance and promote stability.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.