Migrant Smuggling: Illegal Migration and Organised Crime in Australia and the Asia Pacific Region

Migrant Smuggling: Illegal Migration and Organised Crime in Australia and the Asia Pacific Region

Migrant Smuggling: Illegal Migration and Organised Crime in Australia and the Asia Pacific Region

Migrant Smuggling: Illegal Migration and Organised Crime in Australia and the Asia Pacific Region

Synopsis

The subject of this volume is the phenomenon commonly known as migrant smuggling - the criminal offence of illegally transporting migrants across international borders. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of migrant smuggling in Australia and the Asia Pacific region in its different aspects and dimensions. It examines the nature characteristics and magnitude, the causes, conditions and consequences of migrant smuggling, and the inadequacies of existing policies and legislation. It compiles, reviews and analyses existing and proposed legislation at national, regional and international levels. It forwards a set of specific proposals that can be woven into a coherent and comprehensve strategy to prevent and combat illegal migration and organised crime in Australia and the Asia Pacific region more effectively in the 21st century.

Excerpt

But finally, whether you succeed or not is up to you.
Now is the time to decide and see if you believe
you will succeed like other migrants to Australia.

This topic has no relevance for Australia.” These were the words I was greeted with in April 1998, when I applied to undertake a PhD study into the smuggling of migrants at one of Australia’s leading universities.

Two years earlier, my phone rang late on a Friday night. At the time, I was an undergraduate law student and did some voluntary work in a local immigration detention centre. the caller was phoning on behalf of a young Chinese man who had been placed in immigration detention and had asked for someone to talk to. His claim for asylum had been rejected at both primary and review levels and now he was awaiting removal to China. a few days later I went to visit this young man. His name was Chang and he was exactly my age. Chang was very distressed and with the few words of English that he knew he asked me “Why am I in prison? I am not criminal.”

Chang left China approximately one year before I met him. He said he was a single child, his mother died when he was young, so he lived alone with his father. During the 1989 student rebellion in China, his father became engaged in protests in the provincial capital Fuzhou. His father was arrested and never returned home. Chang then lived with his uncle, not knowing what happened to his father. Like so many young men from Fujian province, Chang wanted to have a better life in another country. He knew about the wealthy and luxurious lifestyle in North America, Australia and Western Europe, and heard about the Chinese communities that existed there. So he contacted the local

From the information provided (in Vietnamese) to the refugees by the Australian selection teams in Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia—“Brief Points for Vietnamese refugees coming to Australia” reprinted in Australia, Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and Defence, Australia and the Refugee Problem (1976) 118.

Monash University, Melbourne [on file with author].

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