Cosmopolitanism in the Age of Globalization: Citizens without States

Cosmopolitanism in the Age of Globalization: Citizens without States

Cosmopolitanism in the Age of Globalization: Citizens without States

Cosmopolitanism in the Age of Globalization: Citizens without States

Synopsis

Thanks to advances in international communication and travel, it has never been easier to connect with the rest of the world. As philosophers debate the consequences of globalization, cosmopolitanism promises to create a stronger global community. Cosmopolitanism in the Age of Globalization examines this philosophy from numerous perspectives to offer a comprehensive evaluation of its theory and practice. Bringing together the works of political scientists, philosophers, historians, and economists, the work applies an interdisciplinary approach to the study of cosmopolitanism that illuminates its long and varied history. This diverse framework provides a thoughtful analysis of the claims of cosmopolitanism and introduces many overlooked theorists and ideas. This volume is a timely addition to sociopolitical theory, exploring the philosophical consequences of cosmopolitanism in todays global interactions.

Excerpt

Lee Trepanier and Khalil M. Habib

Since the end of the cold war and the advent of globalization, interest in cosmopolitanism, with its ideas of global justice and citizenship and the like, has been on the rise. Although cosmopolitanism is not new, it is easy to see why it has gripped the post-cold-war imagination. Cosmopolitan is a term often used to describe a citizen of the world: an enlightened individual who believes he or she belongs to a common humanity or world order rather than to a set of particular customs or traditions. Cosmopolitans consequently believe that peace among nation-states is possible only if they transcend their parochial identities and interests in the name of a global state or consciousness. To this extent cosmopolitanism appears democratic in spirit.

This inspiration for global community has its roots in classical antiquity, where politics was defined as being “based upon reason rather than patriotism or group sentiment.” The ideas of Zeno’s “cosmopolis,” Diogenes’ “citizen of the world,” and Cicero’s “common right of humanity” influenced modern thinkers who sought to reconcile the idea of a universal community with a specific one. For example, John Stuart Mill proposed patriotism éclairé as an alternative to nationality with the hope that, given the proper education, members of the human race would attain an ideal devotion not only to their countries but also to the world. More recently, Kwame Anthony Appiah made an appeal for a “cosmopolitan patriotism” that recognizes the need of belonging to a particular community as a necessary condition to transform cosmopolitan ideas into a desirable political project. Jürgen Habermas’s “constitutional patriotism” and Ulrich Beck’s “cosmopolitan nationalism” are other attempts to reconcile cosmopolitan . . .

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