Inside China's Grand Strategy: The Perspective from the People's Republic

Inside China's Grand Strategy: The Perspective from the People's Republic

Inside China's Grand Strategy: The Perspective from the People's Republic

Inside China's Grand Strategy: The Perspective from the People's Republic

Synopsis

Chinas enormous size, vast population, abundant natural resources, robust economy, and modern military suggest that it will emerge as a great world power. Inside Chinas Grand Strategy: The Perspective from the Peoples Republic offers unique insights from a prominent Chinese scholar about the countrys geopolitical ambitions and strategic thinking. Ye Zicheng, professor of political science in the School of International Studies at Peking University, examines Chinas interactions with current world powers as well as its policies toward neighboring countries. Despite claims that repressive domestic policies and an economic slowdown are evidence that the countrys efforts toward modernization will fail, Ye points to Chinas inclusion in the G-20 as an indicator of success. Ye compares Chinas global ascension, particularly its emphasis on peace, to the historical experiences of rising European superpowers, providing an insider look at a country poised to become an increasingly prominent international power.

Excerpt

Late at night on September 20, 2008, my old schoolmate and friend Professor Guoli Liu called me from the United States with some good news. The translation of my book Inside China’s Grand Strategy was now complete and would soon be published by the University Press of Kentucky.

After the phone call, I was very excited and could not fall asleep for a long time. I was happy as well as a bit anxious. I was happy because this edition of my book would enable more English-speaking readers to acquire a better understanding of China’s grand strategy of peaceful development. But I was anxious because the Chinese original had been completed in 2002 and published in 2003 (with a Korean edition appearing in 2005), by now a number of years had passed, and both China and the international community had undergone some significant changes. For example, when I wrote my book, the Iraq War had not yet occurred, and, by September 2008, it had been going on for more than five years. Also, when I wrote my book, China was making numerous preparations for the Olympics, and by now the Olympics had been successfully concluded. The whole world had witnessed how the new Beijing staged a magnificent ceremony. Have the contents of my book passed the test of time? Is the point of view expressed in it already passé? Might the book mislead readers?

I have reviewed the main contents of my book several times. Happily, I am convinced that it is neither one of those works that is out-of-date before it is published nor one of those absolutely worthless and philistine works that should be immediately consigned to the remainder bins. Of course, some of the statistics cited in the book have changed a lot by now. For example, over the period 2000–2007, the U.S. GDP rose from $9.83 to $13.8 trillion, and U.S. military spending rose from $400 to $700 billion, and, over the period 2002–2007, China’s GDP increased from $1.02 to $3.2 trillion, its per capita GDP increased from $900 to more than $2,000 . . .

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