Feminism, Nation and Myth: La Malinche

Feminism, Nation and Myth: La Malinche

Feminism, Nation and Myth: La Malinche

Feminism, Nation and Myth: La Malinche

Synopsis

Drawing from the humanities and the social sciences to interrogate the development of feminism, queer studies, and Latina/o studies, the editors of this volume examine the literary and cultural debates the figure of la Malinche has generated in critical circles by addressing the state and direction of Malinche scholarship.

Excerpt

Amanda Nolacea Harris

Feminism, Nation and Myth: La Malinche examines the literary and cultural debates La Malinche has generated in critical circles by addressing the state and direction of Malinche scholarship. This contribution joins voices from the humanities and the social sciences to interrogate the development of feminism, queer studies, Chicano studies, Chicana studies, Latina/o studies, and the interaction particular to our post-Civil-Rights-Movement field. La Malinche has forced us to critically analyze the interaction and interdependence of race, class, and gender. She demands that we decolonize all facets of her legacy, and disassemble and reconstruct concepts of nation, community, agency, subjectivity, and social activism. The fact that she is the “paradigmatic figure of Chicana feminism,” as Norma Alarcón has stated, speaks to the errors of culture. Her ironic silence demands attention. Alarcón has stated, concerning La Malinche and the direction of Chicana/o history that, “to let go of figures that offer both a paradigmatic example of experience and a syntagmatic one is for women to work against themselves.” Alarcón urges us to stop isolating epistemologies of oppression, and to heed those figures whose wholeness provides a model for whole decolonization. This volume takes us beyond the isolation of the agendas within Latina/o studies, proposing that we cease to look at feminism, Marxism, and race as antithetical critical perspectives. The participants in the conference and the authors of these essays recognize the responsibility of the decolonial desire that Emma Pérez describes in her Decolonial Imaginary. Latina/o studies, not fitting into post-colonial or colonial studies, seeks to rescue neglected subjectivities, revise simple binaries, treat internal issues with parity, and provide history. These daughters and sons speak with the speech and silence of our foremother, taking the necessary . . .

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