Creating Sustainable Community Programs: Examples of Collaborative Public Administration

Creating Sustainable Community Programs: Examples of Collaborative Public Administration

Creating Sustainable Community Programs: Examples of Collaborative Public Administration

Creating Sustainable Community Programs: Examples of Collaborative Public Administration

Synopsis

Daniels provides a collection of in-depth case studies of tested sustainable community programs and offers guidance to students regarding successful implementation strategies. He and his contributors look at a variety of sustainable community programs that have been successfully implemented in local communities. While most of these programs exist through government funding or regulation, one--"Food Gatherers"--is a purely voluntary, non-profit program without any government funding.

Excerpt

In August 1997, I arrived on the campus of Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania (SRU) to coordinate the new Master of Public Administration (MPA) graduate program. During my first semester, I was assigned a graduate level course in state and local government management. I had heard about an innovative project on the sru campus that applied the principles of sustainability to a homestead that included a house, barn, and gardens. I read some brochures that described the project and decided that my mpa graduate students would learn something about sustainable principles that were relevant for local communities if we took a tour of the project site. On a Saturday morning, students from the state and local government management class and I met at the Harmony Homestead and Macoskey Center for Sustainable Systems Education and Research and were given a tour by a graduate student enrolled in sru s Master of Science in Sustainable Systems graduate program (called the MS3) who lived on the homestead.

Our tour of the Harmony Homestead and Macoskey Center just scratched the surface of the many projects in sustainable systems in which the homestead and center are involved and which are explained in depth in Chapter Three. Nonetheless, what I observed opened my mind about the possibilities of applying sustainable principles to local community programs, and the questions I asked myself provided inspiration and direction for this book. First, to what extent do sustainable community programs facilitate citizen participation and in turn create collaborative relationships between citizens and their governments? Traditionally, local officials administer programs for citizens. Once sustainable community programs are created, however, this relationship changes: citizens now administer their own programs in collaboration with local officials. Sec-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.