Penitent Brothellers: Grace, Sexuality, and Genre in Thomas Middleton's City Comedies

Penitent Brothellers: Grace, Sexuality, and Genre in Thomas Middleton's City Comedies

Penitent Brothellers: Grace, Sexuality, and Genre in Thomas Middleton's City Comedies

Penitent Brothellers: Grace, Sexuality, and Genre in Thomas Middleton's City Comedies

Synopsis

"Panitent Brothellers focuses on the recurring incidents of repentance and conversion in Thomas Middleton's major comedies. Panitent Brothel's conversion in a Mad World, My Masters and Sir Walter Whorehound's repentance in A Chaste Maid in Cheapside are familiar examples of behavior that, while having precedents with St. Augustine and St. Paul, had been newly described by Luther and Calvin." "This study emphasizes close readings of Middleton's city comedies to reveal the importance of repentance and conversion in his theology." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

“Penitent Brothel” is the name of Thomas Middleton’s best-known penitent, a character in A Mad World, My Masters. Middleton uses the term “brotheller” to describe Theodorus Witgood in A Trick to Catch the Old One (2.1.3). Hence my coinage of “penitent brothellers” to refer to the penitents and converts in Middleton’s comedies, the characters upon which this study focuses.

All of the texts which receive major consideration in this study have long been accepted as Middleton’s works. However, I also refer to texts for which his authorship has only been accepted recently. Therefore, I am taking as his canon the list of works to be included in the upcoming collected works of Middleton, to be published soon by Oxford University Press. The play I refer to as The Second Maiden’s Tragedy will be included as The Lady’s Tragedy; the title I use comes from the Revels Plays edition. In a few instances, I will note similarities between texts long accepted as Middleton’s and those for which his authorship has only recently been proposed; such observations, of course, strengthen the authorship arguments. However, I will not argue for the authorship of any text; the reader may refer to the editions cited and the discussions which will be in the Oxford edition.

The editing principles of the texts I use vary in degrees of modernization of spelling and punctuation. I have decided to keep the spelling of each edition, even though this may present slight difficulties for the reader. I also use several texts for which there is no modern edition. For these only, I have modernized the usage of u, v, i, j, and s. I have also expanded the spelling of words for which the early modern abbreviation is no longer common: “cõuersant” becomes “conversant”; “yt” becomes “that” (unless “it” is intended). Any other changes are marked as such with brackets.

Bible quotations without a specific translation reference come from the 1611 King James translation. The rest will be marked as coming from Middleton’s pamphlet The Two Gates of Salvation and the Geneva Bible.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.