Scottish Life and Society: Boats and Fishing, Coast and the Sea - Vol. 14

Scottish Life and Society: Boats and Fishing, Coast and the Sea - Vol. 14

Scottish Life and Society: Boats and Fishing, Coast and the Sea - Vol. 14

Scottish Life and Society: Boats and Fishing, Coast and the Sea - Vol. 14

Synopsis

Covering every aspect of human life in Scotland, this list of ethnological papers makes a substantial contribution to ethnological scholarship, particularly in national identity. In addition to papers, aids to ethnological research are included and are classified as such under subject headings.

Excerpt

The need for a Bibliography for Scottish Ethnology, to serve national as well as international purposes, has long been felt. Ireland has its Bibliography, A Bibliography of Irish Ethnology and Folk Tradition, Dublin and Cork: Mercier Press, 1978, by Caoimhin Ó Danachair. This has been followed in more recent years with one by John Widdowson, et al., Bibliography of British Folklore, Institute for Folklore Studies in Britain and Canada, 1996. This present compilation, primarily of Scottish but with some comparative material, makes a substantial contribution to the resources available as guides to research and teaching. With the setting up of an established Chair of Scottish Ethnology based in the School of Scottish Studies of the University of Edinburgh in 1990, and a second Chair of Scottish Ethnology at the University of Aberdeen in 1995, the subject of ethnology was given a substantial boost. Since it has to do with every aspect of human life, the interaction of individuals with families and communities, regions and state, and the physical and mental environments of past and present times, Scottish ethnology is especially well-suited for research into questions of national identity, and must be seen as a ‘national’ subject (like the study of Scottish history, or Scottish language).

Though many European countries have been familiar with ethnology as a subject since the late nineteenth century–under a variety of names such as ‘Volkskunde’, ‘Folkliv’, etc.–it was only with the founding of the School of Scottish Studies in 1951 that systematisation of the subject began within a Scottish university, with a full-scale teaching programme leading to a single Honours degree in Scottish Ethnology. Taught courses are now being prepared also at the Elphinstone Institute, University of Aberdeen. In England, the University of Sheffield has, within the Department of English Language and Linguistics, a lecturer in Folklore/Folklife Studies, who also acts as Assistant Director of the National Centre for English Cultural Tradition. In the University of the West of England at Bristol, there is the Centre for European Studies, which has established a ‘European Ethnology Research Network’ on a computer web site. In Ireland, teaching goes on in the Department of Irish Folklore at University College, Dublin and at the Department of Folklore and Ethnology at Cork.

Because the subject is a relatively recent one, it is still searching for its specifically Scottish parameters within the wider traditions of European, and also American, ethnology. Writings of an ethnological nature are still confined to the works of a handful of scholars. These are covered in the Bibliography. It has, however, also been necessary to include a large number of entries, under appropriately classified headings, as aids to ethnological research. It is particularly in this area that the Bibliography for Scottish Ethnology will assist in developing the subject and also bringing it to the . . .

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