Liturgies of the Western Church

Liturgies of the Western Church

Liturgies of the Western Church

Liturgies of the Western Church

Synopsis

The liturgies of the Word and the Lord's Supper that are included in this volume range from those of the church fathers Justin Martyr and Hippolytus through the Roman Mass (in both Latin and English), to the great Reformation liturgies of Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, Knox, Baxter, and Wesley, as well as the Middleburg Liturgy of the English Puritans and the Westminster Directory. In addition to his translations, Thompson draws upon copies of many original documents to insure accuracy. An introduction, which places the liturgy within its tradition, accompanies each text.

Excerpt

We live in an era of liturgical revival.

In the past fifty years, Catholic scholars have devoted prodigious research to the sources and history of the Roman rite. In the first quarter of the century, the Benedictines contributed the monumental Dictionnaire d’archéologie chrétienne et de Liturgie (1903 seq.). From the start of that project to the present time, the lively output of books has continued steadily, and with it our debt to such scholars as Cabrol, Duchesne, Baumstark, and Jungmann. Their work, augmented by that of countless others, has already brought certain changes in Catholic practice and has penetrated to parish life itself.

The liturgical renaissance in Protestantism (and especially in America) has not enjoyed such an orderly course, for it has been stimulated by a variety of forces. Certainly the scholars have had their share in it. Maxwell has aroused considerable interest in the origins of the Reformed rite, while Davies offered virtually the first insight into the worship of the English Puritans. Lutherans, here and abroad, have devoted themselves to Luther’s liturgical ideas and to the relationship between theology and worship. Brilioth and Dix have contributed books of the highest order concerning the history of the Eucharist But perhaps the scholars were not the main contributors. In the American churches there began an amorphous revival of “liturgy,” which left almost no group untouched, not even the Dunkers. In part it may have . . .

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