La Diabla a Pie: Women's Cuentos from the New Mexico WPA

La Diabla a Pie: Women's Cuentos from the New Mexico WPA

La Diabla a Pie: Women's Cuentos from the New Mexico WPA

La Diabla a Pie: Women's Cuentos from the New Mexico WPA

Synopsis

Prácticamente todos los paéses que integran Latinoamérica están vinculados a los Estados Unidos, entre otras cosas, por el tema migratorio. Ese paés ha sido visto siempre como la mejor alternativa para encontrar prosperidad económica. El tema se hace particularmente relevante para pueblos que comparten fronteras con Norteamérica, como México. Numerosos relatos literarios ocupan como temática las causas y consecuencias de ese dilema histórico. Pero no siempre fue próspera la economéa estadounidense. Muchos recuerdan la gran depresión de los años 30, como un peréodo triste. A todos les llegó su parte con aquella crisis. La administración del presidente Franklin Roosevelt instituyó entonces un proyecto con escritores del que ahora se compilan sus frutos. Los autores de este libro participaron en la confección de un registro que atrapa en relatos la realidad del momento.

Excerpt

This book is the work of many people. Many years ago, Erlinda Gonzales Berry and I spent several afternoons in the New Mexico History Library Archives in Santa Fe looking at the wpa files, then stored in manila folders in filing cabinets, and easily accessible to anyone who wanted to look at them. We read some of the stories and laughed with them. We wondered at how easily anyone who wanted to could simply steal those typewritten and yellowed pages. We thought about the translations and asked if the original Spanish versions were anywhere to be found. To this date, I have been unable to find any of the Spanish originals. Subsequently, I traveled to the National Archives in Washington, D.C., to see if I could piece together any more of the stories, some of which were missing from the New Mexico files. I published several of the stories in my anthology Infinite Divisions: An Anthology of Chicana Literature (with Eliana Rivero) and continued to think about them and to teach some of the stories in my classes.

In 1994, Teresa Márquez received a grant from the Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage Project to microfilm the collection that was at the New Mexico History Library Archives. At the same time, she made some photo copies of the women’s stories, which she allowed me to use. in the summer of 1996, the Research Opportunity Program of the University of New Mexico provided me with an undergraduate research assistant, Barbara Gonzales, who spent the summer copying some of the stories into the computer and analyzing them. For her project, she wrote a research paper on the Women’s Stories of the wpa. in 1997, I applied for a grant from the Recovery Project in order to finish inputting the stories into the computer. After we received that grant, Barbara, now a graduate student at the University of New Mexico, finished that task. a Spring 1998 fellowship at the Bogliasco Foundation Institute of the Arts and Humanities on the Ligurian Coast of Italy provided me with solace, the Mediterranean, delicious pasta, and uninterrupted time to finish my research and write the introduction. At that time, Teresa Márquez also finished a wpa bibliography. in the fall of 1998, Xochitl Shuru . . .

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