The Woman Who Lost Her Soul: And Other Stories

The Woman Who Lost Her Soul: And Other Stories

The Woman Who Lost Her Soul: And Other Stories

The Woman Who Lost Her Soul: And Other Stories

Synopsis

Many of the folklore-based stories in this volume were published by Gonzalez in periodicals from the 1920s through the 1940s.

Excerpt

My sister Tula and I did everything together. We went
horseback riding to the pastures with my grandfather, took
long walks with father, and visited the homes of the cow
boys and the ranch hands. We enjoyed the last the most.
There were Tío Patricio, the mystic; Chon, who was so
ugly, poor fellow, he reminded us of a toad; Old Remigio
who wielded the metate with the dexterity of peasant
women and made wonderful tortillas. Tía Chita whose
stories about ghosts and witches made our hair stand on
end, Pedro, the hunter and traveler, who had been as far as
Sugar Land and had seen black people with black wool
for hair, one-eyed Manuelito, the ballad singer, Tío Cami
lo; all furnished ranch lore in our young lives.

—Jovita González, in Dew on the Thorn

It is indisputable that as a whole the works of Jovita González represent a valuable artifact of the history and culture of south Texas at the beginning of the twentieth century and are an indispensable element in the recovery of the literary legacy of Mexican Americans. Jovita González is considered by some critics today as a pioneer of Mexican-American literature because she achieved success as an educator, writer, and folklorist, despite the adversities that she faced as a Hispanic woman within a society and an epoch in which intellectual matters were almost exclusively dominated by Anglo American men.

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