Inside Out: What Makes the Person with Social-Cognitive Deficits Tick?

Inside Out: What Makes the Person with Social-Cognitive Deficits Tick?

Inside Out: What Makes the Person with Social-Cognitive Deficits Tick?

Inside Out: What Makes the Person with Social-Cognitive Deficits Tick?

Synopsis

Children and young people diagnosed as having conditions that cause social-cognitive deficits have to be taught how to relate to others and solve personal problems. Inside Out contains materials and resources for helping such individuals.

Excerpt

In the mid-1990s I took a job with our local high school district, not having a clue as to why a high school would need a speech language pathologist. My previous work experiences had been at the Indiana Resource Center for Autism (IRCA) in the mid-1980s, and in medically based neuro-rehabilitation. I was then a mother of young children and was looking for a work schedule that allowed me maximum home parenting time, with minimal job responsibilities. Little did I know that I was about to launch into the most demanding job I had ever experienced. As it turned out, the high schools in which I worked had a great number of undiagnosed students with social-cognitive deficits. On my second day on the job I was asked to screen a 14-year-old girl who had been placed in Communicatively Handicapped classes all through school, but was being considered for dismissal from speech and language services. As I screened her I noticed she was bright on her test performance but odd in her social presentation. I reviewed her school records and found that she was diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) at the age of four. It was astonishing to me that, with this early diagnosis, she had never been provided with a consistent treatment approach related to her being on the autism spectrum! When I met her she was enrolled in a Severely Emotionally Disturbed class demonstrating limited tolerance of the world around her. She was not developing skills towards independence. I was concerned about both her class placement and the psychotherapy based treatment model that was being provided to her. As I spoke about her with fellow teachers and psychologists, other students were referred to me to screen. To cut a long story . . .

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